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Full text of "St. Mary's Muse"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://archive.org/details/stmarysmuse19201921sain 






3fcaleta!), H. C. 



QHiankggfotng Jlunrfier 

JJobember, 1920 



gaa Mary's School library 



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CONTENTS 



Literary Department: page 

The Prodigal Son (Story) . . .Julia Andrews Marks 3 

Everyman's Thanksgiving (Verse) Louise Egleston 6 

Dreams (Sketch) Lenore Powell 1 

Betty (Story) Mabel Norfleet 9 

An Inspiration and a Thanksgiving (Story) Lenore Powell 15 

The Sieve (Sketches) 22 

Editorial 24 

School News: 

Fair Week News 25 

The Fair 25 

"Irene" 25 

The Football Game 26 

Fair Week Visitors 26 

Blue Ridge Meeting 26 

Lecture Recital 27 

Faculty Recital 28 

The Hallowe'en Ball 28 

Muse Club Party 30 

The Japanese Tea ,. . . . 31 

The Seniors Are Surprised 31 

The Carolina Glee Club 32 

A Carpenter's Serenade (Verse) 33 

Advertisements 34 



f The St. Mary's Muse 

THANKSGIVING NUMBER 
Vol. XXVI November, 1920 No. 2 

LITERARY DEPARTMENT 

Edited by the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society 

EDITORS 
Lotjise A. Egleston 
Mabel Norfleet Lenore Powell 



The Prodigal Sor) 

By Julia Andrews Marks 

Far up on the lonely mountain side stood an age-old hut, lowly and 
weatherbeaten, hidden by the dark trees from the eyes of the law. 
Now, covered with winter snows, it sheltered an old woman paralyzed 
and fretful through years of suffering and misfortune. Her eldest son, 
hard-hearted, ignorant, and uncouth, lived there with quiet, patient 
Annie, his wife. But every morning "Old Ned," as he was called by 
their neighbors in the valley, took his gun and went through the woods 
to the still, a quarter of a mile away, where he spent the day. Mean- 
while, there was one comfort to cheer the two women in their ceaseless 
task of maintaining the home — a little girl in a red calico dress. She 
had winsome brown eyes and beautiful dark curly hair. Her mother, 
proud of the pretty child, looked at her often and sighed as she remem- 
bered her own youth and the days when she had gone with her father 
into a town far, far away from the lifeless mountain and had seen 
lovely ladies with happy faces and beautiful dresses. But to the aged 
grandmother the child was a constant reminder of Dick, her youngest 
son, who had gone with his father, at the age of six, to Nashville. News 
had come of the father's sudden illness and death in the city, but no 
trace had ever been found of the bright boy with the big, thoughtful 
eyes. For thirty years the stricken mother had mourned and hoped 
and each movement of little Ellie's brought only a joy mingled with 
bitter sorrow to her heart. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Now it was Thanksgiving Day again and a cold blast of wind chilled 
the tiny cottage as the door swung open to the touch of the child's 
hand and little Ellie entered, her arms rilled with damp wood, which 
she piled in a corner behind the stove. 

"Oh!" she cried, happily, "Granny, papa's going to kill the biggest 
pig of all today. He said he would, just because it's Thanksgiving! 
And mama's baking some extra apples. She says Thanksgiving was a 
big day at her home when she was a little girl. We're going to have 
cranberries too. Oh! I'm so glad, glad, glad!" And the child clapped 
her hands as she danced about the room, with only a hazy idea of the 
real significance of Thanksgiving. 

"Old Ned" came home early to dinner that day, bringing with him 
a stupid mountaineer and his worthless son, the "moonshine" guards. 

"We done quit work for the holiday!" he laughed loudly, as he threw 
the big gun and the overcoat, inherited from his father, on a little straw- 
bottomed chair, the pride of the household. "Dinner ready?" he 
asked, turning to the busy woman bending over the stove. 

Dragging the long wooden table into the center of the room, Ellie 
and her mother soon spread forth the lavish meal. Everyone was happy 
now and softening his voice somewhat, "Old Ned" spoke lovingly to 
the old woman as he moved her chair to the head of the table. Such 
joy had not been known in the mountain dwelling for many a day, 
and even the two sullen helpers thanked their happy fates that they 
had been invited to such a feast. 

"I think we ought to say a little prayer to God, just today, Ned," 
plead the God-fearing housewife. "At home we used to do it always." 

There was something in the very atmosphere that touched the hearts 
of all who sat around the table and so when no one spoke, Annie repeated 
a prayer that she had learned a long, long time before. Then the 
merry meal began and princesses in velvet robes enjoyed their Thanks- 
giving dinners no more than did little Ellie in her red calico dress, 
which was not much the worse for two years' hard wear. 

Late that evening the little girl went down to the spring to fill the 
buckets with water for the evening meal. She stayed much longer 
than usual and Annie was throwing her shawl about her to go to see 
what could have befallen the child, when suddenly she rushed into the 
room, breathless with excitement, her pretty curls flying in every direc- 
tion, and her cheeks burning. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



"Oh, mama," she began, "There's two men out there! And they're 
Iressed so funny — like city men — big coats and — oh, they stopped me 
it the spring and asked me where I lived and what my name was. 
[ told them and they asked me about papa. But they were very kind 
md brought the buckets up the hill for me. They're waiting now. 
rhey want to see papa." 

"Old Ned's" interested expression changed to one of horror. Help- 
essly he looked at his agitated wife and with a groan he cried, "The 
Government men! They'll get me now! What can I do? Hide me 
mick, Annie! Oh, hide me!" 

It was pitiful, indeed, to behold this big strong man crying like a 
)aby. Suddenly he ceased his moaning and made a dash for his gun. 
But Annie was there before him. 

"No, sir," she commanded sternly, "hide if you want to. But there's 
o be no blood shed in this house while us women folks are here." 

A sharp rap at the door caused more consternation in the room. 
Attle Ellie nestled down in bewildered terror at the feet of the tremb- 
tng, feeble woman sitting by the fire. Annie motioned her husband 
o a hidden corner behind the stove and cupboard curtains. Then she 
talked calmly to the door and opened it. 

"If it's my husband you want," she said to the men standing there, 
'he's not in. The kid was wrong. He left the house just after she 
rent to the spring and will be down in the valley all night and 
laybe tomorrow too. So you might as well go on, I guess," she 
nished as she prepared to close the door. 

"A moment, madam," interposed one of the men, "might we not 
ome in just to warm our hands by your stove? The night is very 
old. Of course we have orders to find your husband, to search the 
ouse if necessary. But if,"— he looked straight into Annie's honest 
yes, "if you will give us your word of honor that he is not here, of 
ourse we cannot doubt a lady's word, and there will be no need of 
earching the house. Is he here?" 

Slowly the old woman had turned her head that she might see the 
ewcomers. Then gradually her look of fear and agony gave place 
3 one of incredulous surprise and wonder. Was it possible? Trem- 
ling, but with a glad light in her gray eyes, the old woman lifted 
erself painfully and tottered across the room. 

Something drew the man in the derby and plain clothes to 
er, while the eyes of the officer with the bright badge scanned the 



The St. Mary's Muse 



surroundings attentively. A moment the officer stood undecided 
what course to take. Then from behind the curtain stepped "Old 
Ned" — but now a new Ned, with shoulders erect and eyes clear and 
bright. 

"Here I am, officer," he said fearlessly. At that moment they 
turned to see a feeble old woman held in the arms of the man in the 
derby — and while they stood wondering they heard her glad cry, 
"My son! Come home again." 

Slowly the officer turned to his prisoner and bowed his head a 
moment. Yes Dick had been a loyal friend to him. And now — 

"I have arrested this man," he spoke to the whole family. "But 
I hereby grant his release." And turning he strode out of the cabin 
door, shutting it after him on an old woman's thankful heart. 



Everyman's Thanksgiving 

The great church door stood wide. Its mute appeal 

An eager footstep in the street had stayed: 
A moment still he stood, its pow'r to feel — 

Then Everyman went in, knelt down, and prayed! 

"0 God, it is not often that I come, 

The world till now has claimed my all in life. 
Yet, God, I thank Thee that Thou hast a home 
For prodigals returning from the strife! 

"My heart's ungrateful path today has turned 
Oh send me strength to tread it nevermore! 
But from this hour to cherish what I spurned — 
The blessed message of the chapel door. 

"To give of all my goods to Thee a part, 
To serve, to love, and most of all to pray! 
To keep, O Lord, forever in my heart 

This all-enduring glad Thankgsiving dayl" 

— Louise A. Egleston 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Drearos 

Lenore Powell, '22 

What is a dream? Some material-minded persons, to whom this 
question might be asked, would consult Webster's dictionary as the 
one reliable source of information, and give, in their own little material- 
minded way, its cut and dried statement as satisfactory and final. 
Dream: a sleeping vision; a reverie; a vagary. But isn't it more than 
this? Isn't it the little, unseen power that urges us to higher things? 
Isn't it his power to dream that makes an individual different from his 
neighbor, that gives him his personality? What an interesting, fanci- 
ful place this old world would be, could we each see one another's 
innermost visions, and dwell in one another's magic houses of reverie! 

Is there anything sweeter than the thoughts that come to a tenderly 
exultant mother as she sees, in the dimply curves, the rose-petal soft- 
ness, the puckery mouth of that baby of hers, the makings of a dis- 
dinguished man of state, or, as the case may be, a magnetic, beautiful 
woman before whom the world bows in unaffected homage? Never 
was there a baby born who was not dreamed over thus. Is it, after all, 
so very sad that the greatest number of them fall far short of their 
parents' extravagant expectations? We must not hint that a flourish- 
ing young necktie salesman is less worthy in his mother's eyes for hav- 
ing been dreamed a noble occupation of the presidential chair. In the 
beginning he was the embodiment of all virtues; he is now, while he 
fills his jaunty position of clerkship; he will, in all probability, remain 
so until the time, when he, a bit gray with years, faithfully sells similar 
neckties in a similar establishment. 

But let us follow the course of the daughter, the future beautiful 
woman with magnetism. She, in her turn, has dreams. At ten curled 
up in her little bed, she imagines herself an actress, a graceful, dancing 
actress, flaunting yellow curls and short fluffy ballet skirts, and kissing 
gracious hands to an adoring audience. This future is most vivid, in 
all its details, after "mother" has treated her to a matinee. 

And the boy? He revels in wild ambitions, changeable as only a 
normal boy's ambitions can be. At times he is a bold, bad pirate, 
gloating with terrible ferocity over his victim, one foot placed on the 
bloody body. Then again, when he lacks the inclination to soar to 
unattainable heights, he sees himself a majestic street-car conductor, 



The St. Mart's Muse 



a skillful ruler of his region of nickels and dimes, dictating with his, 
"This way, lady. Kindly don't push," the coming and going of the city 
at large. 

However, our little boy, and likewise our little girl, grow up, with 
miraculously speedy growth. And as the years fly by, so also fly 
constantly shifting dreams. The girl's future varies from that of a 
red-cross nurse, gloriously courageous on the battlefield, to an intellec- 
tual, efficient professor of English, (this after she has read an inspiring 
article on Woman's Place in the World); from that of seductive 
screen-vampire to the (inevitable) mistress of a "darling bungalow 
with roses, and a baby and all." 

The boy's dreams are equally as varying and interesting. He longs 
to be second Douglas Fairbanks, scaling all manner of insurmountable 
objects with a triumphant grin and easy agility; a dare-devil aviator 
taking spectacular risks with his life; a surgeon handling ruthless 
instruments with an artist's skill. 

There are none of us who do not dream, however covertly, however 
unconsciously. And no matter how impossible our dreams may be, 
they play no small part in keeping us "up to the mark" in making us 
firm believers in ourselves and our powers; in putting joy and inspira- 
tion into our lives. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Betty 

Mabel Norflbet 

The living room of the old Stuart home in the little town of Oakmere 
was quite the coziest place imaginable. Any mortal should have been 
content to be seated on the comfortable, deeply cushioned sofa, even 
if the additional bliss of being able to gaze into a deep glowing coal 
fire had not been added. However, Betty Stuart lay at full length on 
that lounge with a frown on her pretty face. Her gaze fell upon her 
father seated in his favorite chair near the window, peacefully reading. 
The ancient mahogany clock on the mantel struck four thirty. Almost 
instantaneously Betty's feet hit the floor with a bang. Then came the 
fireworks. 

"Dad! I do wish I had somebody to play with!" 

"Run out in the yard and play with Tom," said Mr. Stuart, without 
raising his eyes from the deeply interesting magazine article he was 
•reading. 

"Tom's not here — 'sides he's always teasing me. I hate boys anyhow! 
I wish Grace and Mary had taken me to ride with them. I want some- 
thing good to eat, dad — do you hear, daddy! ! ! I wish you would pay 
a little attention to me, nobody ever does!" 

"Well-er, honey, I suppose there are a plenty of biscuits and jam in 
the pantry." 

"No! There ain't — Tom's eat 'em all — he rushes to the pantry 
every day when he gets home from school so he can eat everything in 
sight before I get a chance to eat anything. Boys are perfect pigs. 
You always let Tom have exactly what he wants." 

"Now, now, Betty child, don't lose your temper. You shouldn't 
speak to your dad that way. Ask the cook where some food is. She 
knows." 

"You make me so mad, daddy! You know it's cook's afternoon 
off. Course mama ain't here either. She's always gone to some party 
or other. I do wish she'd stay home with me sometimes." 

"Betty, I don't care to have you speak of your mother again in that 
manner. I am really surprised!" and Mr. Stuart actually put down 
his magazine, he was so displeased. 

"Well, what can I do if I can't play and can't even have anything 
to eat when I'm so hungry? Take me down town in the automobile 
so I can get my skates fixed, quick — then I'll go and skate on Main 



10 The St. Mart's Muse 



street. Tom broke 'em, daddy — he slipped 'em the other day and of 
course he had to break 'em — boys always do. Come on, please, daddy, 
it won't take but just a little while." 

"I suppose I may as well," said Mr. Stuart, "with a sigh of regret as 
he closed his book. "But you must hurry or the shop will be closed. 
Run and put on your sweater and hat. No, you positively cannot go 
without a hat, it's too cold." 

So Betty seized her sweater and tarn from her mother's wardrobe, 
grabbed her skates from the back porch and rushed into the yard. 
Her father soon followed her and they went together to the auto. This 
auto is worthy of honorable mention. To begin with it was a Ford. 
In this case, however, it was not as other Fords were — it was a most 
unusual Ford. It was one of the first Fords ever made — one of the 
few autos which Oakmere could boast, ill modeled after the 1906 
plan. The color of this remarkable machine was none other than a 
brilliant, flaming red, and the trimmings were brass, shining brass, 
which winked and shone brilliantly as a soldier's buttons on dress 
parade. Betty jumped into the front seat of this unusual Ford and 
gazed at its seemingly intricate levers, etc., with a placid possessive 
eye. "Dad," said she, "I do wish you'd hurry, it'll soon be dark." 

"Don't be impatient, Betty. You must remember I can't tell an 
auto to get up and go as I might a horse." He turned on the switch 
of the aforementioned Ford then he seized the crank and began to 
twirl it. That Ford was like, in only one respect, to present day 
Fords — it was stubborn. Its stubbornness was probably provoked 
this afternoon by the haughty manner in which Betty eyed it. Poor 
Mr. Stuart whirled the crank until he was breathless — then, sad to 
relate, he lost his temper somewhat. He turned on the spark with a 
vicious twist of his hand — then he jerked the crank still more viciously. 
And that viciousness was his own undoing. A shiver went over the 
Ford's internals and at the same time a queer shiver passed over Mr. 
Stuart's frame. With a cry his left hand clapped over his right arm — 
he turned away and began to walk up and down the road leading to 
the gate. Then — "Betty," he said in a sharp voice, "I've broken my 
arm, run into the house quickly and 'phone Dr. Anderson to come here 
immediately." 

Betty had been staring at him all this while in petrified amaze- 
ment. She knew something dreadful had happened — something inside 
her said over and over like the tick-tocking of a clock — "It's-all-your- 



The St. Mary's Muse H 



fault, it's-all-your-fault." At the sound of her father's voice she 
roused herself and somehow forced her paralyzed limbs to move. She 
managed to whisper in a faint voice, "Yes, daddy, I will." Then she 
ran as fast as her frightened legs would carry her into the house and to 
the 'phone. She jerked up the telephone receiver and waited for 
central to come. She waited in vain; central, like most centrals, was 
in a peevish mood just when she was wanted most— therefore, poor 
Betty stood for what seemed to her centuries (in reality only five 
minutes) waiting an answer. Finally she realized she must do something 
—(her dear daddy was hurt and it-was-all-her-fault-all-her-fault). The 
only way to get the doctor was to run clown town to his office and get 
him— at least that was the only imaginable way to solve the problem 
according to her frightened brain. No sooner had the thought come 
than Betty carried it into effect. She was quick— was Betty. 

She ran— she fairly flew, out of the house, through the gate, finally 
into the street. Yet to her it seemed she was running at a leaden snail- 
like gait— that she was making no progress at all. The few pedestrians 
she met smiled at her, thinking she was playing some game. The child 
fell twice on the hard ground bruising and cutting her hands and knees. 
She Was up in no time, however, speeding onward, ever onward toward 
the goal her whole being was set in reaching— the doctor's office. Her 
breath began to sob in her throat, her legs to get unsteady, but she ran 
on and on. At least— only one block more— here, now, was that the 
doctor stepping into his Ford roadster?— Yes, it truly was. She must 
stop him. She did— she reached him just as the car was beginning to 
move. "Doctor, oh— Dr. Anderson— wait just a minute, please." 
"Jump up quickly, then. I'm in a hurry, Betty." 
"Yes, sir. Daddy, my daddy, has broken his arm— he, he was 
cranking up the automobile to take me down town to have my skates 
fixed— Oh! it's all my fault. (She began to sob convulsively.) I 
couldn't get central. Oh! I didn't know what to do." 

"There, there, child, you mustn't cry. You must be brave like your 
daddy. I know all about it, your daddy 'phoned me himself. We'll 
be there in a jiffy and fix his arm just right." 

They were there in a jiffy. The doctor was a really modern up-to- 
date Ford driver. His driving would be looked upon with respect 
even in this day and generation. They found Mr. Stuart pacing up 
and down his bedroom— a low moan escaping his lips every now and 
then. 



12 The St. Mart's Muse 



^ "Pretty bad, Stuart," said the doctor upon examining the arm, 
"you must have given that fool crank an awful wrench. Yes, and this 
is the same arm you broke some years ago. Bad, bad, you' must be 
very careful this time." 

The doctor turned to his kit. There at his elbow was Betty— her 
terror-stricken eyes gazing straight at him. "Betty," he said, "isn't 
there anyone else in the house or anywhere about? No? Well, dear 
you will have to help me, then. Be brave!" 

^ When it was all over, Betty silently crumpled upon the floor. 
"Fainted? Well, that's to be expected after what she's been through. . 
No, Stuart, you lie still, she'll be all right in a second. Poor little one. 
She's been a little Trojan— and I think she's been taught a lesson j 
that will remain with her all through her life." 

Betty was soon lying on the couch in the living room still rather wan 
and pale. "Doctor," she whispered as he bent over her, "how's dad?" 

"He's doing all right, child. You lie still, but tell me, where is your 
mother. I must 'phone for her." 

"She's at a card party, I don't know where— but I think Mrs. John 
Arrowsmith's." 

"Well, I'll soon see. Ah! I believe I hear her coming in now." 
So saying he stepped out in the hall to break the news of her husband's 
misfortune to Mrs. Stuart. She was quite calm. She had to be, under 
Dr. Anderson's calm, cool, gaze. When he left her, however, some of 
the calmness left her. 

When she saw Betty lying on the couch in the living room her temper 

began to get the better of her. "Betty, you should be ashamed to lie 

there when your poor father is by himself with a broken arm. Why 

aren't you with him? No, you needn't answer me— I'm going to 

give you the lecture you thoroughly deserve. You are a selfish, bad, 

little girl. It's all your fault your father broke his arm— every bit of 

it— you ought to be ashamed of yourself. You needn't cry— that isn't 

going to help matters one bit. There, Betty, don't sob so you'll worry 

your father. I suppose you are sorry— yes, I know you are. Now run 

over to the dining room and get your supper. Susan has just come— 

she's giving Tom his supper now. You and Tom must go to bed as 

soon as your supper is finished— run along now, dear. Remember, 

you and Tom must be perfectly quiet— dad is suffering a great deal."' 

_ The rest was lost as Betty shut the living room door and slowly 

tip-toed to the dining room. She found brother Tom in full possession 



The St. Mary's Muse 13 



of the table and its contents. "Well/' he greeted her, "I hope you're 
satisfied now, Miss Stuart— making daddy break his arm. Yes— uh, 
huh— now cry— I heard all about it. Doc told ma, and Susan was 
talking too. Now cry— little cry baby." Here he suddenly stopped— 
the truly "hurt dog" pitiful look in his sister's eyes gave his conscience 
a twinge of remorse. Hadn't he often worried dad just as much and 
wasn't it just fate that made it happen that she instead of him had 
through selfishness caused their nice old dad such pain and suffering? 
He began to gobble hot waffles very fast— and— when he looked up 
again it was to hear a sob and the sound of the dining room door softly 
closed. Tom was really nonplussed now. Betty must be sick or some- 
thing. She hadn't said a word to him in reply to his horrid, cutting 
speech. He so far forgot himself as to leave his waffles and the rest of 
his delicious supper. He suddenly decided to go down town and buy 
candy for Betty. He knew her favorite— that would be the pipe of 
peace, if anything ever would. 

Betty had gone to her dainty little bedroom just above her father's 
and sobbed her heart out on the fresh covers of her bed. She wished 
she could die— nobody loved her— her mother hated her and daddy, 
her sweet, dear daddy, never would forgive her. It-was-all-her-fault- 
all-her-fault. She was a selfish little beast — her mother said so — 
Tom said so— he would tell everybody how she had made her father 
break his arm— everybody in town would hate her. Oh! how she did 
wish she could die. The miserable child finally sobbed herself to sleep. 

An hour later she was awakened by a gentle touch — the touch which 
could belong to only one person in the world— her mother. "Betty, 
dear child, your father has told me what a brave little girl you were 
this afternoon and I'm proud of you, darling. Now, now, you mustn't 
cry you'll disturb dad— he's only gone to sleep, he's feeling much 
jbetter. Child! You have been lying here with your clothes on, and 
ko cover over you. Come, undress quickly, you'll catch your death of 
bold— hurry, child, or else I'll have another invalid on my hands. 
There, now, I'll cover you up snug and warm, then you must go to sleep. 
Are you feeling perfectly well now, Betty? Tell me— I suppose I'd 
better 'phone the doctor anyway." 

"No, mother, I'm feeling all right. I never was sick. You mustn't 
worry. Kiss daddy good night for me." So her mother left her to the 
and of pleasant dreams. 



14 The St. Mary's Muse 



Some time later Betty was awakened by the sound of her father's 
moans, which came from his bedroom beneath her own. Betty was 
terrified — she knew her dear daddy was dying. She must go and see — 
what was that? Absolutely no need to fear — that sound was one which 
was copyrighted "Tom Stuart." Then— "Betty, you awake?" 

"Yes, Tom." 

"Mother says you mustn't worry about dad — his arm hurts a good 
bit but he'll get along 0. K. tomorrow. Bet-er-I say you know what 
I said to you tonight. I — I'm awful sorry, Bet. You really are a little 
brick. And say — you like peanut candy, don't you — and here's some- 
thing for you." He slipped a little package into her hand. "Bets, 
dad is a good 'un ain't he? Well, I guess we've both been pretty rotten 
to him and ma, too. We'll do better, eh?" 

"Yes, Tommy, it's a bargain." 

"Shake on it, sis," and Tom nearly squeezed her hand in two. "Good 
night, Bets, be good," and then to Betty's amazement he kissed her 
awkwardly on the cheek. Then with a mumbled "Good night, you're 
a brick," he stumbled out of the room, leaving a new Betty, a sweet 
real sho' 'nuf "brick" in the highest sense of the word. 



The St. Mary's Muse 15 



Aq Inspiratior} and a I hanksgiving 

Lenore Powell 

A Letter from Charlotte May to William Toms 

May 29th ; 1920. 
Oh, let me tell you something, Bill, dear! I have an idea— "idea" 
is a simple word to use — what I mean is something bigger than that — 
finer. Do you know, Bill, I'm really serious, so you must listen to me 
and understand as you always do. 

I was lying in bed the other night, Thursday it was, long after 
"lights-out," and I was thinking about you (you know that) and every- 
thing else lovely that I could imagine, so's to have pleasant dreams. 
Somehow I couldn't go to sleep; I was feeling worried — it seemed to 
me I was so shamefully "no-count." Here I am, just fooling round in 
school, being as happy as possible and absorbing as little knowledge 
as possible, and waiting, so patiently and kind of trembly-like— for 
the time when we can get (oh, it thrills me to say it) when we can get 
married! And, Bill, we have to admit that's not exactly a noble occu- 
pation for any girl, especially when it's going to take her, Bill, con- 
siderable length of time to make enough money to bring the wonderful 
occasion about. 

So, 'way into the night I came to a decision. Bill, I'm not going to 
marry you at all! Oh, it sounds so hard when I put it that way, and 
you can't tell a bit by the words how it nearly kills me to say them. 
Because I love you — every bit as much as I ever did — even more, I 
believe, because I've made up my mind to give you up. Don't tell 
me, Bill, that this is a freakish, school-girlish plan. It isn't! Why, 
I haven't even told you the plan yet! I'm not being fair with you, am 
I, Bill? I want to go way up in the back-woods, where people are 
ignorant and miserably poor, and teach them things— teach them 
anything that will help them and everything I know. Everything! 
What a pitifully little bit that would be, should I dash off into the sticks 
here and now. But I'm not going to do that, of course. It'll take 
years — or that is, several years, maybe, to be trained. 

Now, Bill Boy, be the sport you always are. Don't fuss at me. 
Say you're glad. If you don't I might weaken. What a calamity that 
would be. Don't forget that I love you, love you, love you. 

The year is almost over. I'll go somewhere this summer to get my 
school-marm "eddication." What do you think of it, Bill? 

Your Chaklie. 



16 The St. Mart's Muse 



Special Delivery 

To Charlotte May from W. Toms 

May 30, 1920. 

Charlotte May, what are you talking about? Do you want to drive 
me crazy? Girl, don't you know I adore you? You must never, 
never write me anything like that last letter again. Dear, perhaps 
I'm taking it too seriously — you have said 'I was too literal minded — 
but on the subject of you I'm never entirely sane. 

It is a noble little thought of yours — that's because you're a noble 
little girl. But you must cast it aside immediately, because, selfish 
though it may sound, I need you more than a thousand little heathens. 
You say that you love me. I wonder. If you did, you could never 
plan so glibly to take yourself away from me forever. Would you 
be happy, Charlie, darling? Would you? I would be miserable. No, 
that is. wrong. I don't know whether I would be miserable or not. I 
would not be in this world any longer, what would be the use? 

It sounds kiddish, Charlie, I know. Maybe I'm making an ass of 
myself. I'm not sure. All I want to know is, do you mean it? If 
you don't answer at once, I'll take the next train down and murder 
the entire body of squeamish principals and the like, so that I can see 
you. 

I love you, Charlie. Bill. 



From Charlotte May to W. Toms 

June 1, 1920. 

Bill Toms, now I am mad. You're hateful to doubt that I love you 
You don't give me a word of encouragement. I'm wretched. I want 
to die! Don't you dare come down here. I'd run a thousand miles 
not to see you. 

I made a mistake, though. I'm not wretched. I'm happy that I 
can do a little good to somebody. 

That's all right! Mother thinks it a grand idea— only she doesn't 
believe I'm going to stick it out. But I am! 

Oh, I feel like crying. Bill Toms, I hate you. Charlotte. 






The St. Maky's Muse 17 



To C. May from W. Toms 
Charlie, Dear: June 5, 1920. 

Well, I didn't see you, did I? You were your usual obstinate little 
self. Of course, it was just as you must have known it would be. I 
arrived, hat in hand, out of breath and red in the face, and asked for 
you. Once they said you were in the infirmary. Then I asked for you 
again, more insistently. I was getting madder every minute, Charlie, 
and I'm afraid I showed it. However, I came away — defeated. It 
took me a long time to get sobered down. I was enraged, and I didn't 
know exactly at whom. 

I'm calm now. After thinking it over I've decided I was a little 
rash; in fact, that I lost myself for the moment at the thought of 
giving you up. Let's both be sensible. At a time like this one should 
be sensible. Think what depends on how we act now, Charlie! Our 
whole lives! I can understand your thinking that you want to bury 
yourself in the wilds of the mountains — every girl has such a worthy 
ambition one time pr another, I suppose. But the danger is in your 
taking it too seriously. Ye Gods! You don't mean it, do you? I 
feel like a naughty boy, Charlie, who is being trailed about, hither and 
thither, blindfolded, not knowing what's coming next. It can't go 
on this way any longer. I can't keep my mind on my business. It's 
true there's not much business yet, anyhow, just a shingle with "Wil- 
liam Toms, Attorney" on it, and one or two insignificant little clients 
who Avant advice on insignificant little troubles! It's rotten, business 
is. But I'm hoping for bigger things — and I'll never have them, 
Charlie, without you to love and keep before me as an inspiration. 

Charlie, dear, give me some peace of mind. Write to me, fuss at 
me — tell me I'm a darned fool! Anything! But do let me hear from 
you. Bill. 



From C. May to her Mother 

June 6, 1920. 
Darling, Precious Mother: 

Oh, I'm all upset. Just as upset as I can be. Bill and I are so mad 
at each other — or leastways, I am with him. Why, mother, he's 
positively officious the way he talks to me, as if I were a silly little 
school-girl planning to go on the stage. It's insulting! Don't you 
think so, mother, dear? 



18 The St. Mary's Muse 



I'm never, never going to write to him again. What do you guess he 
said in his last letter? He said, "Every girl has such a worthy ambition 
sometime or another, I suppose." See how lightly he regards it! Noth- 
ing would keep me down off those mountains now. 'Course, I hate to 
be going out of spite to Bill. It isn't that at all. But it will be kind of 
gratifying to show Bill a thing or two. 

So let's begin right now to plan how it's really going to come about. 
I'm going to send in my application — right away— to a summer school, 
and write to Mr. Sidney who is at that little mission in the Ragged 
Mountains. Remember last summer when he preached at home? 
He said they needed help so much up there. Oh, mother, it begins to 
look really possible. And I want you to know that I'm not rushing 
into this like mad, not even taking into consideration the discomforts 
that are sure to come with it. Why, mother, I've pictured everything; 
no dancing nor music nor boys, no chocolate fudge, marshmallow sun- 
daes, no soft cushiony bed, no bath tub — nothing! But what will it 
matter? I know I'll enjoy it as much, and feel so satisfied at the same 
time — if I can only make the poor little children happy. Somehow 
I always think of them as haggard and old-looking. I don't see why, 
though. Maybe there are some freckled-faced, grinning ones. You 
never can tell. 

If you should accidentally see Bill, mother, be sure not to mention 
me. You might even snub him a little. He's such a hateful old thing. 
He makes me so unhappy I feel like crying. 

With all the love in the world for you, mother, dear, 

Charlie. 



From Mrs. May to C. May 

June 10, 1920. 
My dear little Charlie: 

Your fuming tirade of a letter reached me this morning. There 
was a great deal in it you did not mean; also a great deal that you did 
mean, Charlie, and I'm glad of that. Since you seem to wish it with 
all your heart, I would not have you do other than turn to a little 
missionary. I can't imagine it, however; it will be like the frog in the 
fairy tales, who turned to a prince— just as seemingly impossible, 
just as astounding. 






The St. Mary's Muse 19 



You are hard on Bill. Sweet old Bill! You know, Charlotte, I always 
had a failing for him. It is asking too much for you to intimate my 
snubbing him; I would as soon think of looking unkindly at Minerva. 
I would be as afraid of Bill's searching, steel-grey eyes as I would of 
Minerva's reproachful meow. By the way, I saw Bill driving his 
little business-like Buick yesterday; he drove up beside the curb in 
his usual courteous, rather joking way and asked if he might drive me 
anywhere. He smiled adorably and seemed as courtly as a knight of 
old, and / felt as young and complimented. I joined him, notwithstand- 
ing the fact that I had a shirtwaist to press and a cold supper to pre- 
pare at home. We had a delightful spin. Bill was undoubtedly worried ; 
his face was strained, despite the fact that he tried so heroically to 
be entertaining. We had quite an intimate chat, but I'm not going to 
tell you about it, Charlie, because, on account of your present attitude, 
I would feel that I was gratifying vulgar curiosity. 

Little girl, be good. Write to me and tell me about what you heard 
from the school and Mr. Sidney. Don't be discouraged, Charlie, 
because everything will be all right. 

Devotedly, 

Mother. 



From C. May to Mrs. May 

November 25, 1920. 
Dearest Mother: 

I'm really getting used to things up here and falling in love with 
them. In love with the little unpapered room, the rugless floor, the 
stove that gives out more smoke than heat, amiable, ignorant old Mrs. 
Watkins, who waddles about scolding the "young uns" and trying to 
make things nice for her "school-marmish" boarder and the "young 
uns" themselves. They grow sweeter every day. At first, they treated 
me rather "offishly," regarding me as something very peculiar and 
strange. But now, they've at last decided I bear them no evil, and 
they're slavishly devoted. They show their interest and earnestness 
in the most pathetically adorable little ways; they pick little bunches 
of short-stemmed flowers which they clutch tightly in their dirty little 
hands and lay on the desk, quite timidly, when I'm not looking. They're 
pitifully backward and terribly anxious to learn. It's fun to watch 



20 The St. Mart's Muse 



them, and so comforting. There are one or two who are so bright they 
are a joy to my soul, and the stupid ones seem most as nice, because 
they need the little help I can give them so much. 

You see, with all this, and working 'round with Mr. Sidney, I'm 
kept busy enough in the day time. One or two nights a week we arrange 
something gay and festive for the children, to give them a little excite- 
ment. 

Day after tomorrow, you know, is Thanksgiving, and we up here 
in the back-woods are planning the biggest blowout. Turkey, just 
like you people in the city, and cranberry sauce, and everything, and 
we're going to be so happy with it all, because we're not a bit used to it. 

Now, mother, I'm going to tell you something. I can't keep it a 
minute longer. I haven't said anything about this before, mother, 
because it seemed too weak and slacker-like. But I have to confide 
in you. I always have, mother darling, and I guess I always will be 
baby enough to keep it up. When all the lonesome sounds start up at 
night, and the frogs and crickets begin to wail, I'm all the time thinking 
about — Bill! Did I really treat him awful bad? I'm beginning to 
think I jumped at a conclusion — only goodness knows what conclu- 
sion! Not that Bill didn't love me. I knew better than that. I reckon 
I was just plain insulted, and my silly little pride hurt — so I dashed off 
here in a heedless hurry, feeling so self-righteous — and leaving Bill! 
I want Bill so! What must he have thought of me? That I was a 
darned little fool, I guess, because that's exactly what I was. I feel 
that I should humble myself — scrape in the dust — before him, and I'm 
going to do it. 

Did you know I loved him all the time I was acting so terribly mean? 
Oh, mother! Oh, Bill! I don't know what to do. One thing I'm sure 
of. I'm going to write to Bill, and tell him just what I think of myself, 
and maybe what I think of him, would you, mother? 

Always lovingly, 

Charlie. 

To Mrs. May from C. May 

Thanksgiving Day. 
Oh, Mother, Mother, Mother, darling! 

Do you see that "Thanksgiving Day" at the top of the page? That's 
exactly what it is. Our Thanksgiving Day. Bill's and mine. Bill is 



The St. Mary's Muse 21 



here! I'm bubbling over with happiness. I can hardly breathe. I 
feel like jumping up in the air and screaming. He is so sweet, sweet, 
sweet! Mother, I just thought about it — Did you know he was here? 
He didn't say so. He just swung up to the cabin with those wonderful 
big strides of his (I was on the porch, by the way, knocked most dumb, 
and scarcely daring to breathe for fear it wouldn't be he) . He looked so 
kind of serious and sweet when he was being introduced to all the 
bewildered little Watkinses and so gracious that the whole family fell 
for him. I was so excited, and my voice trembled, and I was ashamed 
of myself. But we did get away by ourselves — I don't remember how 
it was — but it was accomplished in an incredibly short time. 

Oh, mother! The spring was singing away, and Bill didn't say a 
thing. Just took me in his arms and held me close. He was so big 
and comforting, I had to cry. I know I got all red and ugly-looking, 
but somehow I didn't think about it then. 

He wouldn't listen to a word of my shamefaced talking. He said 
we could explain everything to each other later. All that mattered 
was that we had each other — that we always would have! 

For — oh, yes, I didn't tell you, did I? We're going to be married in 
the little chapel. And, since they don't need much legal advice up here, 
we won't stay very long. We'll just come back to see them often, 
because they're real friends of ours, you know. Mother, you must 
pack up and catch the next train to see your happy children. 

I hear the sound of the voices in the chapel singing "Come, ye Thank- 
ful People, Come" — they sound so clear and young. And, oh, mother, 
dear, I am thankful. 

All my love, 

Charlie. 



22 The St. Mary's Muse 



"THE SIEVE" 

The strains of Lohengrin filled the large room, but the spectators, 
who were seated in rather a silent row against the wall, did not appear 
to take much interest in the proceedings. With slow but rather hesi- 
tant steps the bride came down the winding stairs, wearing a veil a 
little too long and heels a little too high. She reached the altar and as 
she met the groom, attired in a long frock coat and a high silk hat, a| 
terrific sound of tearing rent the air, followed by a wail of indignation : 
"Why, Bobbie Burns, you've ruined mama's best lace curtain! She: 
never will let us play any more!" 

Evelina Beckwith. 



I am only a looking-glass, not very large and not very old, but I 
am worldly wise and thoroughly sophisticated because I have been] 
showered with so many different "views of life" — I am among the 
lucky few who have honors thrust upon them. But sometimes dis- 
honors are mixed in too for when an ugly frowning countenance scowls 
at me I reflect what I see and am greeted with more than frowns. I 
know more than most mere mortals because I have to be watching, 
whether I want to or not, while people are making themselves present- 
able for others to behold ; but I would be broken if I told even half that 
I know about my mistress — whom people call beautiful. 

Josephine Forbes. 

It takes great tact and skill to ride a mule. First you must politely 
bow to Maud, and ask her if she will deign to allow your humble self 
to ride on her most august back. If she nods her head you may then 
try to mount. You may start to climb upon her back, but if she flirts 
her tail swiftly, jump down, (if you value your life) for she is becoming 
angry. When she finally calms down quickly mount and let her go. 
Don't try to guide her! Just let her go where she will, for if you don't 
suit her she will eventually get rid of you anyhow. If she balks youj 
must try persuasion. Say something soothing; compliment her; 
and if your voice isn't too sweet sing to her; she may start with you 
but most probably without you. 

Annie Owen 



The St. Mary's Muse 23 



"Sammy Jones! Will you please stop that noise this instant! I 
am trying to write a letter and you drive me nearly distracted." 

"Oh, Sis, you're always doing something and you don't ever want 
me to have any pleasure." 

"Young man, will you please hush!" 

"Gee! but you've got a temper! I wouldn't be your husband for 
anything. Why the other day when Mr. — " 

"Sammy, leave the room this instant." 

"Can't." 

"You can't? Why not, pray?" 

" 'Cause I got a cold and ma told me not to put my foot outside 
this room; you don't think I'm going to disobey ma, do you?" 

"Well, for heaven's sake be quiet!" 

"Sis." 

"What, Sammy? You are the most exasperating brother a girl 
ever had!" 

"Well, I just had something to tell you; but if that's the way you 
feel I won't." 

"Please do, Sammy." 

"What'll you give me?" 

"A dime." 

"Make it a quarter and I'll tell you; but not for one red cent less 
'cause I know it's important to you and you're dying to know." 

"Well, all right, fire away." 

"Yesterday I heard Mr. Kern tell a man that you were the most 
er — oh, I've forgotten what he did say." 

"Sammy." 

"Oh, yes, the most 'adorable girl in the world.' " 

"Why, Sammy! did he really? Why, I must write this whole letter 

over again!" 

Maht L. Hakding. 



The St. Mary's Muse I 

Subscription Price -----____ Two Dollars 
Single Copies --____ Twenty-five Cents 



A magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, 
Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial \ 
management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 



EDITORIAL STAFF, 1920-1921 

Frances Vlnable, '21, Chairman 

Katherine Waddell, '21 Louise A. Egliston, '22 

Susan Collier, Business Manager 

Helen Budge, Assistant Business Manager 



Ernest Cruikshank, Faculty Director 



EDITORIAL 

Thanksgiving Day! What does it mean to us? Is it a spiritual orl; 
material matter with school-girls? Let us hope a measure of both.}! 
It would be a pity indeed if we were among the class of mortals to whom ' 
Thanksgiving means only a day of glorious and unlimited eating- 
food and drink without end. They are thankful perhaps, in a way; 
but how vainly thankful! "Thanksgiving" is a strictly American |, 
institution, a heritage from our devout Pilgrim fathers. And one of 
the things for which they were most indebted to their God was his ft 
priceless gift of food. No, we would not have the day bereft of one bit 
of its full measure of feasting and good cheer. But, on the other hand, \ 
for how many more lasting evidences of His care our ancestors were i 
thankful, and would we break faith with those who laid for us the cor-I 
ner-stone of American gratitude by forgetting the better, the deeper, j 
the more enduring gifts of God's mercies to our nation? If we would 
not then let us bring hearts of true thankfulness today to Him whose 
bountiful goodness crowns all our days. 



The St. Mary's Muse 25 



SCHOOL NEWS 

Fair Week News 

On the stroke of six o'clock Tuesday afternoon, October 19, Study- 
hall was over and with it the school work ended until Friday morning. 
For two "big clays" faculty, officers and student body pulled together 
for a good time and had it. 

Tuesday evening nearly half the School had tickets for the big 
historical pageant given under the auspices of the Woman's Club of 
Raleigh. The scene was arranged artistically out-of-doors against a 
back-ground of autumn foliage. The attractive costumes and quaint 
folk-dances depicted charmingly the age of "good Queen Bess" when 
our gallant young hero, Sir Walter Raleigh, crossed the Atlantic for 
the purpose of founding on American soil an English colony. So 
clearly were the old stories of Raleigh's life and expeditions revealed, 
and so delightfully were they set off by singing and dancing at intervals 
that we all brought away a new and vivid picture of early North Caro- 
lina. Then came the jolly walk home in the crisp October air. If 
the pageant had not been so good we might say, "the last part of any 
party is the best part of all." D. K. 

The Fair 

On Wednesday came the fair and in many laughing, chattering parties 
of a dozen each the St. Mary's girls stepped off the cars at the fair 
ground gates. For four happy hours the delights of the merry-go- 
round, Ferris wheel, the "whip" and the aeroplanes were patronized 
fully. Many were the wonderful high dives, two-legged pigs, pony 
riding-lions, snake charmers and fortune tellers that were visited. 
Then there were juicy "hot dogs," good ice cream, sandwiches and 
snowy cotton candy to be eaten and cold lemonade to go with it all. 
And when all eager feet grew tired and purses flat there were still gay 
souvenirs and bright balloons to claim one's last quarter and to be borne 
home in weary triumph to grace the campus at St. Mary's. 

"Irene" 

On Thursday afternoon Miss Davis chaperoned a large party to the 
Academy of Music where the matinee performance of the musical 
comedy, "Irene" was staged. From the first pause in the chatter of 
the crowd when the curtain went up and the audience made the acquaint- 



26 The St. Mary's Muse 



ance of "Donald," "Irene," "Madame Lucy" and the "ladies and 
gentlemen of the chorus," until the last "hero, heroine, and company" 
tableau the interest, enthusiasm and applause were continuous. The. 
vivacity, sparkle, charm and humor of the bobbed-haired Irene were 
irresistible. And the comical figures of "Madame" and "Mrs. O'Dare" 
brought a hearty laugh from everyone. Of course the hero was — well 
everything that the heart of a school-girl could desire; and the echoes 
of the strains of "Alice Blue Gown," "Irene" and "Castle of Dreams" | 
are still very much alive in our hearts. 

The Football Game 

Devotees of "Carolina" and "N. C. State" alike turned out in full 
force from St. Mary's on Thursday afternoon to witness the foot-ball ; 
game between those two athletic rivals. The usual big crowd attended ; 
and many out-of-town visitors who had come over for the game rode 
through the grove during the day. The game turned out in favor of 
"N. C. State" by a score of 13 to 3. St. Mary's received a royal sere- 
nade from the victors that night and sang them a song written for the 
occasion. By nine-thirty the happy girls who were fortunate enough 
to have their parents in town, were all trooping in again and our holidays 
were over. 

Fair Week Visitors 

Among the visitors to St. Mary's during fair week were a number of 
the last year Seniors. Nina Cooper, Jane Toy, and Mary Yellott 
spent Thursday with "Moke" and paid us a flying visit en route to 
Oxford. Alice Cheek, Millicent Blanton, Katherine Batts, Margaret 
Rawlings and Lucy London Anderson also gave us part of their holi- 
days visiting in school. Ellen Lay and Mary Pickett, girls of '19, came 
out to school and their many friends were also glad to have Leonora 
Blount, Athalia Tayloe and Irene Grimsley back again. 

Blue Ridge Meeting 

At an inter chapter meeting of the Church School Service League 
on Sunday evening, October 24, the student body gathered in the parlor 
to hear from the Blue Ridge delegates all about the conference. Eliza- 
beth Thomas, chairman, called the meeting to order and announced 
the opening hymn, "0 Sion Haste." A very interesting talk was given 
by Lenore Powell in which she told us of a day at Blue Ridge. Follow- 
ing her Louise Egleston made a few remarks concerning the recreation 
and general good times the delegates had on the trip. Frances Venable 



The St. Mary's Muse 27 



then told of the serious side of Blue Ridge, sketching the work of the 
missionary classes and the text books used. Miss Katie spoke for the 
benefit of the leaders, on the work outlined for the year and Elizabeth 
Thomas read the report of the finances of the League. 

The meeting closed with the hymn, "The Church's One Foundation." 
We hope that the testimony of last year's delegates will bring as many 
more enthusiastic girls to Blue Ridge next summer. 

E. H. C. 
Lecture Recital, October 25th 

A charming lecture-recital was given in the auditorium by John 
Powell and George Harris, Jr., Monday, October 25. The old girls 
remember with much pleasure Mr. Powell's concert last year, but this 
year he brought us the message of the relation of patriotism and music, 
in the form of an interesting lecture. 

Both Peace and St. Mary's became intensely enthusiastic over Mr. 
Harris' interpretation of folk songs, the most popular being "Billy- 
Boy" and "Froggie Would A Wooing Go." 

This is the first of the Peace-St. Mary's entertainments, and we are 
looking forward to many more as pleasant this winter. 

PROGRAM 

Part One 

Lecture — "The Americanization of Music" John Powell 

Part Two 
Songs by George Harris, Jr. 
English Folk Songs (arranged by Cecil Sharp) 
The Wraggle-Taggle Gypsies 
Barbara Allen 

Blow Away The Morning Dew 
Lord Randal 
The Crystal Spring 
The Briery Bush 
Lord Thomas of Winesberry 

American Folk Songs (arranged by Cecil Sharp) 
The Deal Companion 
The Riddle-Song 

Lonesome Tunes (American — arranged by Howard Brockway) 
The Dying Soldier 
Billie Boy 

The Sweetheart in the Army 
Frog Went a-Courting 

E. G. B. 



28 The St. Mary's Muse 



The Faculty Recital 

On Monday evening, October 18, at eight-thirty o'clock, St. Mary's 
and a large number of visitors enjoyed a beautiful faculty recital in 
the auditorium. The stage was artistic in its simplicity of decoration. ! 
Large ferns formed the green background to which a bit of color wasj 
added by a vase of pink roses on a tall pedestal. The faculty recitals; 
are always anticipated with pleasure and this year the repeated encores ; 
of the audience attested to their appreciation of the selections. Mr. i 
Jones' artistic accompaniment lent its charm to Miss Spofford's appeal-/; 
ing interpretation of "The Old-fashioned Town" which she gave as am 
encore. Miss Fox's numbers showed rare feeling and musical skill i 
and were enthusiastically applauded. The wonderful technic and style 
which Miss Southwick's playing always shows were well displayed m) 
the beautiful "Hungarian Rhapsody" which closed the program. It 
was as follows: 

Etude in E Major Chopin 

Ballade in A Flat Major Chopin 

Miss Southwick 

Aria from "Sampson and Delilah" Saint Saens 

Miss Spopford 

Clair de lune Debussy 

Minstrels Debussy 

Fantasie op. 49 Chopin 

Miss Fox 

Melisande in the Wood Alma Goetz 

The Danza Chadwick 

Miss Spopford 

Hungarian Rhapsody No. 12 Liszt 

Miss Southwick 

E. N. 
The Hallowe'en Ball 

The annual Hallowe'en ball, given in the gym on Saturday evening, 
October 29, is remembered with so much pleasure by faculty and 
students alike that it deserves especial mention among the events of 
the school calendar. At eight o'clock the bell summoned to the parlor 
some hundred and fifty of the gayest and most fantastic costumes ever 
known in the history of St. Mary's, for the opening "Grand March." 



The St. Mary's Muse 29 



Down the gym steps with majestic tread they filed, led by Mary Louise 
Everett and Margaret Huske— quite bewitching models of the Hal- 
lowe'en ballet. Then round and round the room they marched to the 
strains of "Clayton's Grand March," played by Miss Sutton. Sud- 
denly the lights went out and into the semi-darkness of the room came 
the awful figures of many sheeted ghosts, dancing in a weird circle 
around the smoking "pot." Truly gruesome was Katherine Waddell's 
chanted "Ghost Song"; and even the bravest heart grew cold as the 
hissing words : 

" — to be a ghost is just lots of fun, 

As you'll find out when you get to be one." 

were heard. Then as the music died away and the ghosts vanished 
the crowd waited anxiously to behold the second act of the long- 
tooked-forward-to "Senior Stunt." What might not those mysterious 
^reen screens hide from our expectant gaze? A moment of suspense— 
and, behold— the lights once again revealed to us the one room of a 
iistrict school, presided over by the most dignified of "school maims" 
n the person of Fielding Douthat. Among her flock were many figures 
amiliar to St. Mary's girls, which we recognized as she called the roll 
;hus : 

jWes Rainey Bottum Katherine Waddell 

truest Cruikshank Frances VenaWe 

^Yenn™ Elizabeth Carrigan 

t .. , , Tr . Susanne Pegues 

|he McKunmon Virginia Jordan 

fer ?;■■•••••• ■« Eleanor H. Cobb 

r" gmia PerklnS Dorothy Kirtland 

Jizabeth Shearer Eleanor Ti P lady 

Iff * 6 • Caroline Moore 

ipheha btone t> u tt- 

,. , „ Rebecca Hmes 

I et bU "° n Elizabeth Nolan 

arren W ^ Elizabeth Nelson 

Conspicuous among the many general laughs provoked were those 
tused by the appearance of Susan Collier as "Duckey," bringing 
nbrella and over-shoes for "Miss Carolina Virginia," who had arrived 
te on account of having "slept through breakfast"; and the amazing 
mouncement of "Teacher"; "Carolina Virginia, you have paint 
1 your face!" "Billy" Stone's ludicrous attempts at a map of Europe; 
Florence Davis'" failure at a creditable rendition of "Young 
jchinvar" and "Ernest Cruikshank's" volley of unintelligible talk 



30 The St. Mart's Muse 






were also enjoyed. With the dismissal of school, amid enthusiastic 
applause the crowd turned its attention to the wonders of the "Devil's 
Cave," where the spirits of the underworld in the persons of Helen 
Budge, Muriel Dougherty, Bessie Brown, Lenore Powell, Winifred 
Waddell, and Anne Kirtland conducted the visitors through their 
domain. 

Katherine Taber and Hilda Turrentine presided over the artistic 
abode of the "Black Cat," while Mary Josey and Beatrice Parker j 
rewarded the lucky ringers of another cat with peanuts and all-day j 
suckers. Eva Lee Glass stirred up in her magic witches' pot the destinies * 
of mortals; and in opposite corners of the room Mary Ambler and; 
Louise Egleston as gypsy fortune tellers traced air castles in the hands 
of their patrons until the rude warning of the "First flash" brought j 

them back to earth. 

Muse Club Party 

The Cruikshank home was the scene of a lovely Hallowe'en party 
Saturday evening, October 23, when Mr. and Mrs. Cruikshank enter- 
tained as only they can, as a surprise treat to the Muse Club. The 
girls found themselves in a world of seemingly familiar figures which 
sported the wildest and most impossible of colored, paper faces; grin- 
ning black cats who raised threatening tails at broom-bestriding 
witches; ouija boards which could be made to reveal the darkest of ; 
secrets under the guidance of eager fingers; strings suporting apples 
which sometimes allowed themselves to be bitten; and colored lamp 
shades which furnished Hallowe'en verses not extremely hard to 
memorize. Salted peanuts and plates of sea foam miraculously appeared 
and disappeared on the tables and then the finishing touch came with 
the appearance of Miss Bottum bearing numberless chocolate ice cream 
cones and real "fudge." Helen Budge and Dorothy Baum, however, 
felt equal to eating one more last peanut and their struggle for the 
possession of it was quite amusing to the witnesses of the contest 
Budge managed to chew her end of the string supporting it first and 
was applauded loudly while she consumed the prize. The party broke 
up reluctantly at nine-thirty and the guests departed thanking their 
hosts for the good time they had and inquiring of each other in ghostly 
whispers on the way home : 

"Spos'n the witches began to witch 

And you didn't know which witch was which — 

Well spos'n?" 



The St. Mary's Muse 31 



The Japanese Tea 

The Japanese Tea given by the Muse Club, November 6 was one 
of the most attractive entertainments of the year thus far. To the 
eyes of the admiring girls, the Muse Room had been changed over- 
night into a fairyland of chrysanthemums. As we entered the door 
we put "dull care away" and entered into the spirit of enchantment, 
enjoying to the "fullest extent," the delicious chicken salad, hot choc- 
olate and sandwiches served by dainty little Japanese maidens, at 
cunning little tea tables. 

Margaret Elliott, with her ever popular violin, was accompanied on 
the piano by Marietta Gareissen, and many were the sighs of con- 
tentment when the familiar strains of "Alice Blue Gown" or "Lone- 
some" were heard. 

From the financial standpoint of the Muse Club it was a complete 
success and from that of the girls — well — . When one of the winsome 
little maidens said: "Don't forget to come back to see us next year," 
the chorus of "Don't worry, we will," was quite deafening. 

E. G. B. 

The Seniors Are Surprised 

It was of a Monday morning — the 8th of November, to be exact, 
that the Seniors were greeted with the last, and most mystifying, of a 
series of anonymous notes. The puzzling bit of paper read, "Seniors! 
Are you ready? ? ? (Signed) Ignota." Most undoubtedly the Seniors 
were ready, with paper plates and tin cups, according to instructions; 
iready to "follow the signs of the Red Tarns." In the midst of lunch 
two red-tammed damsels arose and departed, much to the astonish- 
ment of the dining-room at large, and in their train arose a whole troupe 
of Seniors and — Juniors, the "unknown" ones! They were off, under 
the protecting wing of Mr. Stone, Junior Class advisor. 

The street car ride was delightfully novel; the woods were beautiful 
in their autumnal coloring; the big pavilion, a short distance from 
Lasater's Mill, an ideal spot for just such a picnic as this was, when the 
highly excited group was joined by Mrs. Perkins, Mrs. Way, Miss 
Stone, Mr. Perkins and Anna Perkins, about two hours later, the most 
fun of all began. Delicious fruit salad was brought into evidence with 
real mayonnaise; bacon strips were fried on long sticks over a fire, and 



The St. Mary's Muse 



eaten in an appetizing way, sandwiched between rolls and real butter 
deviled eggs and all kinds of sandwiches proved a source of undisguisec 
pleasure. 

The affair was pepful, and enjoyed by one and all. In fact the Juniors 
must certainly have felt repaid for any toil expended on it, so genuine 
was the appreciation and pleasure of all who partook. 

L. P 

The Carolina Glee Club 

The night of November 13, 1920, marks a red letter entertainmen 
on the St. Mary's calendar. For was not that the night that comei 
but once a year — the time when the St. Maryites might gaze unrebuke 
upon the forbidden specie — the male? Yes! 'Twas a strange sigh" 
when the auditorium curtain rolled up and displayed rows of gentle 
men — real gentlemen — not girls masquerading in gentlemen's clothing. 
Then came songs which brought back fond memories of the golden 
summer of long ago (1920). A local "Ashes to ashes" provoked much 
mirth while the unique "Studies in Polyphony" (to use plain English, 
"Studies in the Art of the Steam-piano") certainly added variety anc 
more laughter to the program. The familiar "Swing Low" was thor-l 
oughly enjoyed as were the Swiss yodeling numbers. But that dance 
music — it seemed almost criminal to be obliged to remain seated whefl 
that luring music fairly begged one for just one waltz or a real fox trotJ 
In fact each number of the program was full of just the kind of pepl 
that every true son of Carolina possesses. The final thrilling number, 
"Hark the Sound of Tar Heel Voices," with one accord brought the 
whole audience to its feet. As a grand finale the Glee Club gave St 
Mary's such a yell that the foundations of the auditorium fairly shooL 

But it did seem to us that the Carolina boys might have found a 
more fitting memento to carry away from St. Mary's than our hated 
brass rising bell. 

M. N. 



The St. Mart's Muse 33 



A Carpenter's Serenade 



A-lath, I quite a-door you dear; 

I've hallways loved your laughter. 
Oh, window you intend to grant 

The wish my hopes are rafter? 

When first I sawyer smile 'twas plane 

I wood rejoice to marry, 
Oh, let us to the joiner's hie, 

Nor longer shingle tarry. 

And now that I have axed you, dear, 
Plumb square and on the level — 

(I've hallways wanted 2 by 4) 
Don't spile hope's happy revel. 

The cornice waving, Peggy dear, 

The gables all are ringing; 
Why let me pine? For oh, you know 

I'm sawdust when I'm singing. 



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Pifrt Mary's School libiars 



St Maxtf* Mu&t 

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Cfmstmas iSumtier 

Ueeenrfier, 1920 




CONTENTS 

PAG 

Merry Christmas (Poem) Eatherine Waddell 

Literary Department: 

The Laughing Brotherhood (Story) Fielding Douthat 4 

Christmas— Everywhere (Story) Eatherine Waddell lfl 

Such is Life (Sketch) Winifred Waddell 16 

Editorial 

The Christmas Doll (A Fantasy) Eatherine Waddell 1 

School News: 

The Studio Tea 28 

The Model Meetings 29 

First Basket Ball Game 30 

The Circus 32 

The Class Parties 34 

Sigmas Win Second Team Game 35 

News Items 37 

Advertisements 



The St* Mary's Muse 

CHRISTMAS NUMBER 



)L. XXVI 



December, 1920 



No. 3 




jftl aidens, youths and happy matrons, 
C ager children, smiles a-beam, 
iv ound the Christmas yule-log gather, 
3& adiant in the firelight's gleam. 
& oung and old are there. 

C hildren with small, awkward fingers 
W elp to weave the holly bright, 
ak udely fashioning a garland, 

3Jn the yule-log's flickering light. 
^ oftly outside fall the snowflakes, 
thickening while the shadows creep. 
Jffl ingling with the merry chatter, 
M s the bright flames upward leap, 
S? ound the Christmas chimes. 



Katherine Waddell, '21 



The St. Mart's Muse 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 

Edited by the Sigma Lambda Literary Society 
Katherine Waddeel, Editor 



The Laughing Brotherhood 

Fielding Douthat, '21 

WyclifT Orphanage, December 20th. 
My dear Anne : 

Just a few lines this morning to tell you that the children's Christ 
mas packages are on the way. The tatting for little Nan was madjl 
by one of our oldest girls, who is very clever and the funny rag doll 
are Gwen's creations. She has worked so hard over those dolls am 
has made one for every child in the orphanage, and I wanted youji 
kiddies to have one, too, for it has always seemed rather pitiable til 
me that rich children should miss the comfort of an old sawdust dol 
just because they have those bold hard china ones, that open and shu 
their eyes and squeak, "Mama" and "Papa." They always seemet 
to me so unsympathetic, somehow. I wish I had something for Ralpl 
but there is nothing to be had in an orphanage for a grown younj 
man. I suppose he is going to be with you Christmas, 'though i 
will take most of his holiday to make the trip from Mercer I 
California. 

Gwen has gone to the station now with the packages. She ha; 
Billy with her — the way that child worships her is akin to idolatry 
She has been such a help to me in managing him, too. Before, thi' 
boy was such a problem — with that over-supply of energy with whicl 
I think the dear Lord meant to compensate him when he so neglecte< 
his books. Bless his little freckled soul. 

I am really quite worried about Gwen going to the station toda^ 
and would have done the task myself but there is such a strong wind 
and the outdoors today is no place for an old lady subject to rheuma 
tism. It is the 20th you know and the day that Lucia College 



The St. Mary's Muse 



own in Tompson, lets out for the holidays. The train is always 
>aded down with the girls, and when the boys from Mercer get on at 
Vilsonville they are such a riotously joyous company. They are 
ymbolic of all the gay pleasures that were Gwen's just two years ago, 
nd what the loss of money and a high ambition to do something 
rorth while have robbed her of. My poor, pretty lamb. She is so 
ut of place here in this bleak spot, with her soft rosy young loveli- 
ess and that brown mop of tumbled curls. Did I tell you that she 
as bobbed her hair ? I was quite shocked at first, and told her that 
le must remember that she was twenty years old and a young lady, 
ad that she was the assistant matron of an orphanage, but she 
leaded that she did it on the grounds of economy and convenience, so 

could not scold her. It makes her look ravishingly beautiful — 
imbled black brown curls over great eyes that hold in them all the 
ivid animation of youth. But surely in youth there is goodness, 
ad Gwen is the soft candle light, the beautiful song of our orphanage. 

But now I must leave you, my dear, for I hear the rattle of the old 
brd that brings Gwen and Billy back again. They are so funny 
tout that old rattle-trap, Anne. They call it the "Bloody Chariot," 
b.d indeed it has that appearance, with all the red mud in Wycliff 
ounty spattered on it. But before I get started again, I must bid 
>u "good-night," my clear sister. 

With best love to Tom and the children, 

Your devoted sister, 

Alicia. 



Wycliff Orphanage, December 22. 

T DEAE A^XE : 

How very dear of you to send the presents for my children. They 
11 be such a help in fixing the tree. Gwen was so happy over them. 
ie does need something to make her happy, poor love. She came 
ck from the station yesterday with such a strained serious look on 
r young face. She was not herself at all. After the children were 
tten to bed she came in my room and talked to me awhile. I had 



The St. Mary's Muse 






an open fire and we made a bit of toast and had some tea. It wj 
very cozy and sweet, and I was so contented, sitting there in m 
comfy chair, with her dark head against my knee. So selfish I f e 
too, when I saw the slender shoulders quivering spasmodically. Whe 
I asked her why she was crying she said that the cozy smell of ir 
room and the old fashioned portraits in their black frames, and n 
little table with its darning basket and Bible made her cry. Sue 
a funny child. But I knew that to be only that homey feeling, ai 
I knew, too, that she had been looking at the bit of mistletoe and hoi 
stuck on the gas jet, so I said, "Gwen, why does the mistletoe axi 
holly make you cry ?" and she smiled and said that she could nev 
hide anything from me, and that it was because of The Laughi? 
Brotherhood ! And Anne, would you like to hear about that laug 
ing brotherhood of hers ? 

Anne, she says that two years ago she was a member of The Laug. 
ing Brotherhood," and that is her name for all the young college bo; 
and girls all the wide world over. She says that she, too, went 
school and danced and flirted and worried not at all. And now, s 
says her two years of worth while work have taught her that there 
as much goood in The Laughing Brotherhood as in the orphanag 
She says that there can be no happy combination, Anne; that wh 
you take one course you lose forever the other ; and, my dear, the si 
part was that I could not for the life of me tell her that she ha 
chosen the wisest course. And now, I must close and take a litt 
time to think over this problem, for I know 'tis not a happy state f<! 
a young girl's mind. 

Good-night, dear, Alicia. 



P. S. : I just received your letter, saying Ralph would be at tl 
Conrads for Christmas. I'm so glad he is to be near me, but an a 
lady in an orphanage can furnish little in the way of entertainmeu 
The Conrads are very wealthy and I hear quite gay. Do you knoi 
Billy has been telling me all day about some young man he saw at til 
train yesterday who helped Gwen with her packages. Billy seen 



The St. Mary's Muse 



to be violently jealous, thinking his own young self plenty capable of 
doing it. It seems Billy said something to me about Gwen's taking 
him up to the Conrads in the Ford, but I don't know. Billy's over- 
frequent remarks have come to make no more impression on me than 
the wind, only just dimly impressing themselves on my subconscious 
mind. But Anne, I wonder now that I've gotten your letter if that 
young man could have been your Balph. And, Anne, do tell me what 
Fraternity it is that Ralph is soliciting money for from old Judge 
Conracl. I do get so mixed up about them, their queer names and 
funny letters, and youth does so resent and pity such forgetfulness. 



Dec. 23rd. 

Just a little note to tell you that it was Ralph, and, Anne, I must 
congratulate you on your handsome, splendid son ! He came up 
yesterday afternoon to see his old aunt. He is charming, Anne. 
Seemed so interested in everything about my work and told me all 
about the house party at the Judges', and was so bouyant and full of 
life. Gwen came dancing in with Billy, both rosy and breathless 
after a romp. It came to me then when I saw those two handsome 
young people together what kindred souls they were, both so wrapt 
up in the very fact of living and they looked most charming together. 
Gwen was shyer than I have ever seen her though I have never known 
her to look more lovely. 

Ralph says he is coming to see me every day while he is here and 
twice or three times if I'll let him. 



Dec. 24th. 
Christmas Eve, and I'm so wonderfully happy, Anne. Everything 
has been so lovely. Do you know that that enterprising son of yours 
induced the doting Judge to give my children a big Christmas tree 
and Christmas dinner? The whole house-party has been over here 
this afternoon. We had a heavy snow storm last night and the boys 
and girls came over in sleighs. The children watched them drive up 
the lane from the upstairs windows, and I could not help but feel a 



The St. Mart's Muse 



stab of pain in my heart when I saw the contrast between those pale, 
pinched, starved little faces, and the healthy young beauty of the older 
boys and girls. And I thought again, as I have often lately, of Gwen's 
theory of the laughing brotherhood and wished that I could convince 
myself that real joy in living and true unselfishness could go hand in 
hand. But, Anne, I just could not ! Tell me, dear, am I losing my 
faith ? Anne, will Gwen slowly lose her youth and great beauty 
and — but I must go on and tell you about everything. 

Well, the boys and girls tumbled in, bearing arm-loads of red- 
berried holly and mistletoe and evergreens. Gwen and Kalph came 
a bit behind in a sleigh by themselves. It was the beginning of a 
whole day of being a bit behind and by themselves all the time. 

Well, lots of the girls went down to the kitchen and they baked 
cakes (great lovely ones !), and stuffed dates and figs and made lots of 
different kinds of delicious looking candies. The boys did the deco- 
rating and they had the place such a mass of green and red and such 
a profusion of bells and spangles you would not have recognized the 
old place. And the tree — the tree is wonderful ! Ealph and Gwen 
did that with the aid of the ever faithful Billy. It is a dream of 
loveliness and stands in the midst of the living room like a beautiful 
bride in the midst of a forest of green and garnet. 

It is late now and every one has gone except Kalph, and he is stay- 
ing to help Gwen put the presents on the tree. So I must bid you 
good-night. 

Merry Christmas to you all, Alicia. 



Later. 

It is twelve o'clock — Christmas morning, but I just had to add 
a few lines and tell you. Anne, I went downstairs awhile ago, and 
thinking Balph and Gwen had gone, went into the little alcove right 
next to the room where the Christmas tree is and played over a few 
of the dear old Christmas carols that mean the very soul of Christmas 
to me. A little later I slipped into the living-room to see that the 
fire was all right, and — oh, Anne, it was so lovely in there ; the banks 






The St. Mary's Muse 



of holly and evergreens, and in the middle the lovely tree with the 
firelight flashing on its tinsel and pretties. Gwen was in my hig 
chair — she was so lovely there in the warm firelight with a bit of holly 
in her hair and the light of love shining out of her great eyes. And, 
Ealph ; well, Ealph was sitting on the arm of her chair, and Anne, 
the two handsome young heads were very, very near together. I do 
hope you won't mind, dear, because they are both so good and sweet, 
but I just tipped away and left them. I was probably not the ideal 
chaperon, but — well, Anne, we must remember that we, too, were 
young once. 



Jan. 6th. 
My dear Sister : 

The clouds have cleared away and I see the sun shining afar off ! 
Gwen is so happy now. She has regained all of that vivid animation 
and belief in the good of her work that she used to have before this 
fever of discontent came over her. And she has every bit as much 
enthusiasm and youthful exuberance of spirits that she used to have 
before she undertook the serious things of life. She says she is a 
member of the Laughing Brotherhood again ! And, Anne, my dear, 
she has come to believe and know that the two things can go hand in 
hand, happiness and unselfishness. 

But, my dear, she is wearing some sort of a queer little pin that 
Ralph gave her. It is just a tiny trinket. You must tell me, my 
dear, what it means, for Gwen seems to treasure it so highly, and 
this old lady must not be so ignorant and behind the times. 

Hoping you had the merriest Christmas in the world. 

Love to you all. 

Your devoted sister, 

Alicia. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse 



Chris troas — Everywhere 

Katherine Waddell, '21 

"You git out a dis hyar kitchen, Miss Ethel. You done worked 
yerself plumb nigh to death," scolded Aunt Patience, chopping 
raisins with vigor. "Jes' let go thet pan, and do as I tells yer." ; 

"Oh, Aunt Patience," Ethel pleaded, "I am not at all tired, and 
I just must make the icing for my Lady Baltimore cake. Isn't it 
a beauty ? It's father's favorite, you know, and I want to make his 
special kind of icing, too — thick and hard, and fudgy — " 

Aunt Patience shook her head reproachfully. "Now, Miss Ethel," 
she said, "Your pa don't want no icin what his li-1 girl done wore 
herse'f out to make. 'Deed he don't ! You ken make it tomorrow 
jes' as well. Lord knows, you mus' be tired, after all the decoratin' 
an' sech what you done today. You jes' go an' res' till time for 
supper, like the sweet li'l girl what you is." 

"All right, then, I suppose I must, since you are running me out 
of the kitchen." Ethel put down the pan, and took off her apron. 
"But I'll be back here in the morning, first thing, to bother you some 
more," reproachfully. 

"Law, honey, you ain't no bother at all ! You'se a blessin', that's 
what you is ! What would ole miss a done widout you to stay widj 
her all winter, when all her chillun is away ? Seem like Providence 
mus' a sent you ! Bless her li'l heart, all time thinkin' about other 1 
folks," Aunt Patience mumbled to herself, as Ethel slipped out of 
the room. "She mought a stayed in de city, if'n her kind heart 
hadn't a sent her out here in de country to stav wid her gran'mJ 
Jus' out a school, too. De Lawd will sho' repay de deeds o' cle right- 
eous." Aunt Patience put her cake in the stove and started grating 
cocoanut for her pies, singing softly to herself as she worked: 

"Rescue de perishin', 
Care for de dying." 

In the drawing-room, Grandma was putting the last touches to thei 
decorations on the big cedar Christmas tree in the corner. The 



The St. Maky's Muse 11 

wood fire crackled softly in the hearth, and shed a faint glow on 
j the big gray cat lying on the rug. 

It was that hour just before dark, when all the world seems to wait 
j for the day to die. 

Grandma went to the window, and stood looking out in the snow 
covered world. She sighed as she turned away from the wintry 
! scene, and Ethel, coming in the door, exclaimed, "Why, Granny, what 
1 big, sorrowful sigh ! What's the matter ? How can you feel sad, 
'with all this Christmas cheer around you ?" Grandma sighed again, 
land then smiled, "What a foolish old woman I am, dearie," she said. 
"You are right. I ought to be perfectly happy— but I can't, when 
my dear baby boy won't be here for Christmas. Bless his heart. 
How we shall miss him ! He has always been the life of our Christ- 
mas reunions. Oh, dear, you don't know how it is — If I could only 
keep my babies all young, so they'd never go away and leave me I" 
She went to the fire-place, and stirred the embers to new life. They 
crackled, and a flame leaped up, shone on a sparkling bauble on the 
tree, and died down. 

"Never mind, Grandma, Lester will be here for New Year, I 
mow," murmured Ethel, consolingly. 

Grandma put a fresh log on the fire, and watched it catch and start 
Ourning. 

"Well, child, I musn't get the blues ; so let's be a little more cheer- 
ful. How many packages did we get, today? The postman was 
oaded down!" She pointed to a large pile of packages of every 
ihape and size, under the Christmas tree. Ethel clapped her hands, 
oyfully. 

"I can hardly wait till Christmas !" she declared. "Sam says the 
Tule log is a beauty. He says he believes it will burn a month— its 
o big ! Isn't the holly lovely ? I wonder who'll be the first caught 
pider the mistletoe!" 

***** # * 

'I say, Steve ! It's the dickens to be away from home this time of 
he year, isn't it, old fellow ?" Lester shut his book with a snap. 



12 The St. Mary's Muse 



"Sure is !" Steve agreed, lighting a cigarette, and leaning back in 
his chair. "I prefer the army to these half-busy, half-idle days we 
spend around here. If we could only get this darned deal through, 
we could both go home for Christmas." 

"JSTo such luck," his partner responded, gloomily, "We'll stick 
through the holidays, I bet my bottom dollar. I got a letter from 
home this morning, and the mater is heart-broken because I won't 
be there for Christmas. You know, I haven't been home since I goti 
my discharge, and I think it is high time for me to become acquainted I 
with my family again." 

Steve blew smoke rings thoughtfully, and then turned to Lester. 

"I'll tell you what, old pal,"he said, "you go on home and I'll 
manage things alone — ." 

"You bet your life I won't !" Lester interrupted quickly. 

"We'll stick together, and don't you forget it ! If you can't see youri 
folks, then I won't see mine." 

A soft knock on the door interrupted the conversation at this point. 

"Come in,"called Steve — "Oh, Miss Lane," to the brown and gold 
vision that met their eyes. "Come right in ! I had forgotten all about 
those letters, and they ought to go off tonight. Have a seat whil 
I sign them." 

Miriam Lane, as she stood framed in the door-way, looked mon 
like a nymph or a fairy than just an ordinary private secretary. 

Her dimpled face was surrounded by a mass of golden hair. Her 
brown eyes had a serious, almost sad expression while her sweel 
mouth seemed almost ready to smile. Her serge dress was of darH 
brown which matched her eyes and made her hair seem all the mord 
golden. 

Lester looked, everyday, at this vision of loveliness with increasing 
interest. Steve had told him her story. How she had come to ]STe"Vi 
York from Eed Bank, a little, Jersey town, after the death of hei 
father, which had left her penniless. Lester admired her pluck anl 
perseverance. He knew it must have been hard those first days| 
searching for employment in that big city where she was never alonfy 
but always lonesome. Steve told him, also, of her homesickness. 



The St. Mary's Muse 13 



At first she had enjoyed the prospect of adventure and life, but that 
soon wore off, and in it's place came an implacable longing for the 
simple people and the simple ways to which she was accustomed. 
Life — real Life, is not all glitter and show, not rushing through one 
crowded day to face another of the same kind the next morning;. 

Miriam sat down in a low chair near the door, and let her dreamy 
eyes wander to the window. Lester watched her ; and as he gazed, a 
daring thought came into his brain — daring because, in his heart, 
though he would not admit it even to himself — he was afraid of this 
beguiling, innocent, and altogether loveable girl. 

"Er — er — Miss Lane," he offered stumblingly. "How about 
taking in a show, this evening, if you have nothing else to do ?" 

"Oh," she said, and smiled — such a smile ! "I would be delighted ; 
but I have a lot of work to do tonight. I am so awfully sorry." 
"Thank you," to Steve, as he gave her the letters. "I will send them 
off, right away," and she went out, taking all the sunlight with her. 

"Old fellow, I believe you are smitten hard," Steve said, as the 
door closed. 

"Well, I'll admit that I think she is a pretty nice little girl," and 
Lester turned back to his books, with a sigh. But he didn't work 
long, for always a sweet face, surrounded by golden curls, smiled at 
him from the pages. 

"By George," he exclaimed, at last jumping up, "I've got to get 
out, and get some exercise ! I've been reading these darned books all 
day." He picked up his hat, and started towards the door. I'll see 
you later, Steve. I have an appointment at five o'clock." 

But if you had seen Lester at five o'clock you would have thought 
that his appointment was with the florist ! He was having roses, — 
a wilderness of them, sent to Miss Miriam Lane's boarding place, on 
the East Side. 



After many attempts and repulses, Lester had succeded in getting 
on friendly terms with Miriam. But always, she was reserved and 
rather distant. She felt that she ought not to let herself fall in love 
with Lester. Though he had shown in numberless small ways that 



14 The St. Maky's Muse 



lie did, she only half believed that he loved her ; — who could tell about 
a young man in a big city like New York ? Probably he was lone- 
some, and liked her companionship. No doubt, he had a sweetheart 
waiting for him "Back home," that wonderful place about which he 
was always talking. 

It was the day before Christmas Eve, and the streets were filled 
with merry, jostling crowds of shoppers. Christmas was in the air. 
Even up in Steve's and Lester's office there was a bit of holiday 
cheer, for a boy had just brought in a big box of holly and Christmas 
greens, addressed to "Mr. Lester Reeves," and marked "From, Mrs. 
John Reeves, Pinewild, North Carolina." 

"Bless her heart," Lester remarked to the room in general, "it was 
just like mother to send it. Gee ! but it makes me homesick," but 
it wasn't until later that he discovered that it made somebody else 
homesick, too. 

Coming into his office, that afternoon, after a business trip down 
town, he found Miriam crying over the big box of evergreens. 

She didn't hear Lester come in, and didn't see him until he was 
very close, and then — it was too late ! 

"Little girl," he whispered tenderly. "Don't cry so. It's Christ- 
mas, dear." 

"Yes, I know," said a muffled voice from somewhere near his i 
heart. "That's why I'm crying. I w-w-want to go h-h-home!" 

"So do I," he murmured, his face on her hair. "Let's go to- 
gether!" 

Then followed an interlude, in which no word was spoken, but they 
were, nevertheless, very, very happy. 

"But how can you leave Steve ?" It was a half hour later, and 
they were sitting together on the couch. 

"Oh, didn't I tell you ?" he said. "His family is going to be here 
for Christmas, and he says for me to go on home, so I can be with 
mine." 

"It's a happy Christmas for everybody," Miriam murmured softly. 



The St. Mary's Muse 15 

The Yule log crackled merrily ; but nobody heard it, because there 
was such a racket in Grandma's old-fashioned drawing room, that it 
was impossible to hear one's self think. 

Aunt Min. was surrounded by a crowd of sticky, tumbled, and 
happy children, clamoring for a story. They had eaten fruit and 
candy until even their insatiable appetites were satisfied. 

The walking doll had walked until her springs had given out ; the 
top had spun until spinning was an impossibility ; the doll baby-cart 
was wheelless, and as Ethel said, "Everything had done its Christ- 
mas duty." 

Cousin Joe was entertaining a group with a hunting story; and 
Ethel and a crowd of young folks were singing Christmas songs, at 
the piano. 

Nearest the fire sat Grandma ; on one side Lester, and on the other 
side, Miriam. 

The newly-married couple were unashamedly holding hands across 
the back of the old lady's chair ! 

Grandma said she was getting acquainted with her new daughter, 
and reacquainted with her youngest son. 

"It sounds like a case of love at first sight," she said, smilingly. 

"Oh, it was was on my part," Lester agreed, heartily. 

"And mine!" Miriam squeezed her husband's hand, unabashed, 
though Cousin Joe and the crowd of cousins — the hunting story 
finished — were descending on them. 

"It is so wonderful to have all my children together, again," 
Grandma sighed, contentedly. 

The fire leaped up and glowed on the happy family group. 

Lester smiled into his little wife's eyes. 

"Peace on earth, good will to men," joyfully sang the young voices 
at the piano. 



16 The St. Mart's Muse 



Such is Life 

Winifred Waddeix 



r 



"You are on jour honor, girls, not to say a word after you ente 

that door. Any girl who speaks may hand me her name at the end 

of the period." 

******* 

"Wasn't it lovely of Mrs. Greene to give this dinner for us ? Gee ! 
I'm so hungry. She knows what we want when we get out of school, 
I'll tell the world." 

"Yes, she's a dear. I'm sick of dances. If only people would 
realize how hungry we are when we come home from school, they 
would give us more dinners and fewer dances." 

Louise and I were putting a finishing touch to our toilettes before 
descending to the scene of festivity. Louise, looking unusually 
pretty in her new lavender satin dinner dress, was taking up all the 
room at the mirror. I tried to elbow myself in front of her, to get I 
a better view of my first black dress, the pride of my soul. With a 
hasty dab of powder to her already white nose and a satisfied pat on 
her hair, she prepared to descend to the hall. I hurried after her 
and we entered the brilliantly lighted drawing room together. 

Mrs. Green had paired us off with two of the nicest boys in town, 
and everything was perfect. But when we entered the dinning-room 
and were seated at the table, which looked gorgeous with its array o: 
snowy linen, silver and cut-glass, I forgot my partner, forgot every- 
thing but the gnawing appetite I had acquired at school, and whic 
was soon to be satisfied. 

My partner and I were placed at the right of our host, and Louise 
and hers opposite us. Fruit cocktail came first, and then soup, but if 
was when the turkey was brought in and placed before Mr. Greene 
that my joy knew no bounds. I glanced at Louise and saw mirror 
in her face exactly what I knew was in mine. I forgot to talk t 
my partner and became all eyes. 

At last Mr. Green was through carving, and we were ready 1 
begin. I had a goodly portion of white meat on my plate. I cu 
into it with my knife, lifted a delicious morsel on my fork — 

Clang! Clang! I awoke with a start. I had slept through a| 
whole period of study hall. 






The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price -----____ Two Dollars 
Single Copies --____ Twenty-five Cents 



A magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, 
Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial 
management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 



EDITORIAL STAFF, 1920-1921 

Frances Venable, '21, Chairman 
Katherine Waddell, '21, 2 A Louise Egleston, '22, E A n 

Editors 

Susan Collier, Business Manager 

Helen Budge, Assistant Business Manager 

Ernest Cruikshank, Faculty Director 

EDITORIAL 

We didn't think the three months would ever pass, did we ? But 
lere it is almost Christmas, and we wonder where the time has flown. 
lust a day or two and we will be attending the Christmas tree in 
he gym, packing our trunks to go home, listening to the Seniors' 
ihristmas carols, and last but not least, boarding our train with 
^appy hearts and beaming faces. And then — we will see the dear 
aces of those we love best in the world, and for a happy interval do 
.11 the things we like best to do, in the place we like best to be. 

The time will pass quickly, and we shall have hardly gotten used 
o home when the time will roll around for us to return to school. 
)f course, we all have a sinking feeling when we think of that. But 
>efore we become too dejected, let us ask ourselves a few questions: 
)o we consider the three months wasted ? Have we not made some 
riendships that we would hate to give up ? Would we be willing to 
orget St. Mary's and all of its associations ? And isn't St. Mary's, 
fter all, the very nicest school we know of ? 



18 The St. Mary's Muse 



And coming back has charms of its own. The Old Girls know, 
and the New Girls can imagine how much fun it is to see "every- 
body" again. Do you remember how excited the Old Girls were' 
over coming back in September ? Well, it is just as exciting foi 
everybody after Christmas. 

Christmas ! that magic word ! It holds a multitude of happy 
suggestions; cozy fire-sides, holly, mistletoe, gifts, friends, mother,, 
home ! We can heartily say with the poet, "Thank God for Christ- 
mas!" 



The St. Mary's Muse 19 



THE CHRISTMAS DOLL 

.s Written by Katherine Waddell and as presented by the Senior Class 
in the Auditorium December 18 

Act I. 

Curtain goes up. Five Brownies dance onto stage, line up in front 
sing: 

We're a jolly band of brownies, of brownies, of brownies, 
A jolly band so full of glee, 
There're surely non so gay as we, 
We've got the pep, you bet. 

(They dance.) 

Faint singing is heard in the distance. "Jingle Bells." 

Enter five Christmas Bells. Costumes bell-shaped with bottom of 

jrirt wired. Tiny bells jingling at every movement. They come to 

■ont of stage and sing: 

Jingle bells, jingle bells, jingle all the day ! 

Oh what fun it is to ride in a one-horse open sleigh. 

Jingle bells, jingle bells, jingle all the day, 

Oh what fun it is to ride in a one-horse open sleigh. 

(Brownies and Bells dance together.) 
First Brownie : Hist ! What is that I hear ? 
All: Sh-h! 

(Sounds from outside: "Whoa, Blitzen. Gee, Fritzen! Whoa, 
rancer !") 

Second Brownie : Santa Claus ! 
All sing : 

Heigho for Santa Claus ! Jolly old, furry old, man ! 
Heigho for Santa Claus ! Catch him if you can. 

(Enter Santa Claus.) 

Santa Claus : Good afternoon to you, my little friends. Christ- 
as is in the air when I see a jolly bunch like you. But, ah, my 
iends, I am sad this merry Christmas Eve. 



20 The St. Mary's Muse 



First Brownie : Why, Mr. Santa Claus ? 

Santa Clause: I have just been through yon dark wood, and it 
grieves my heart to tell you that I have just lost a very valuable 
thing. 

All: Oh! 

Santa Claus : There dwells in a cottage on the border of the wood, 
a little girl with sweet blue eyes and golden curls. Edith is her name. 
Every day she has written me a letter, begging me to bring her a doll 
that has real hair and can open and shut its eyes. It pleased me to 
get the doll for her and I brought it, a pretty china doll, all the way 
from the North Pole, only to lose it in the dark woods, just at the eve 
of Christmas. It must .have slipped out of my sack in the snow. 
Little friends, I am sad. 

First Brownie : We are so sorry, Mr. Santa Claus. 

First Bell : And we, too. 

Second Brownie: Isn't there something we can do to help you r < 

Second Bell : And we, too ? 

All : Let us search for the doll ! 

Santa Claus (brightening) : By Jove, little friends, that is a 
happy thought. 

(Brownies dance around Santa Claus, singing:) 
You just leave it to the Brownies, the Brownies, the Brownies, 
Although we oft make blunders 
We can accomplish wonders 
We'll do it yet, you bet ! 

(Repeat) 
Santa Claus, (rubbing his hands) : This is encouraging. 
(Bells dance and sing:) 

Santa Claus, Santa Claus, 

Let us help you, too, 

Although we're not so very big 

There is lots that we can do. 

Santa Claus : You are very kind in your offers to help. Now ] 
think a crowd like you would frighten the little doll. Anyway, ] 



The St. Mary's Muse 21 



want a bunch of you to go into the forest and get a Christmas tree for 
the little girl. I think I'll select one Brownie — here, High Jinx, 
you're the man for me, and one Bell. Let's see, Tinkle, you are the 
one I want. 

(Tinkle and High Jinx step forward.) 

Santa Claus : Mind you do not stay out too late if your search 
seems fruitless. It is getting dark, and I must begin making my 
rounds early. Off with you to the forest. ( Waves hands at Brownies 
and Bells. ) See that the tree is not too tall for a humble cottage and 
make haste. 

Exit Brownies and Bells, (with the exception of High Jinks and 
Tinkle) singing : 

Jingle Bells, etc. 

Santa Claus, (to High Jinx and Tinkle) : Farewell, my little 
friends, God speed you on your way. (Exit.) 

Tinkle: We must go, too, High Jinks; 'tis growing late. See 
the sun hangs in the west like a ball of fire ready to fall and be 
extinguished. 

High Jinks : Let us away. 

They sing : 

Away, away, into the darkening wood, 

The breezes blow, 

East falls the snow, 

But we must hie away, away. 

'Tis Christmas Eve and all the Christmas Toys 

Will soon be stacked, 

In stockings packed, 

Of all good girls and boys. 

Away, away, into the darkening wood ! 

The breezes blow. 

Fast falls the snow, 

But we must hie away. 

(Curtain.) 



22 The St. Mary's Muse 



Act II. 

(Scene, a forest. Ground and trees are covered with snow. Enter 
Tinkle and High Jinx.) 

Tinkle : How cold it is here ! 
High Jinx : And how dark. 

Tinkle : Where shall we search ? Surely the poor little doll must 
have fallen somewhere in these bushes. (Goes to clump of bushes.) 
(Enter White Eabbit.) 
Tinkle and High Jinx : Good afternoon. 
White Eabbit: Greetings. (Squeaks.) 

High Jinx: I pray thee, forest friend, have you seen anything 
of a Christmas doll ? 

Tinkle : With eyes that open and shut and real hair ? 

White Eabbit : A doll ? 

Tinkle: Yes. She is very pretty. 

White Eabbit : No, no. I have been in the forest all day — since 
sun up, but I have seen nothing that resembled a doll. 

High Jinx : Santa Claus lost her. 

Tinkle : And she must be awful cold. 

White Eabbit: I am sorry, friends. I'll keep watch for her. 
Mayhap she is hidden in a hollow tree or log. I must be on my way 
as I must get home to my children. They will be hanging up their 
stockings before long. (Hops off.) 

Tinkle : And think of poor little Edith hanging up her stocking 
and there is no doll to go in it. 

High Jinx: Think of the poor doll, out in the cold. She must 
be freezing. 

Tinkle: And awful lonely. 

High Jinx: Let's look behind that log. Maybe she has fallen 
to sleep somewhere. 
Tinkle: What's that? 
(Two snow balls roll in.) 
Tinkle and High Jinx : They're snow balls ! 






The St. Mary's Muse 23 



Snow Balls sing: 

Roll, roll, in the soft, soft snow ! 
Take a little twirl and away you go ! 
Skip, trip, and stump your toe — 

We're happy as the when we're in the snow ! 

(They dance.) 

High Jinx: I pray you, merry Snow Balls, have you seen any- 
thing of a little Christmas doll ? 

Tinkle : With eyes that open and close and real hair ? 

First Snow Ball: A Christmas doll! Pray, what would a doll 
be doing out in the cold, and night so near ? 

Second Snow Ball : Pray, what ? 

Tinkle: Santa Claus lost her, poor dear. 

First Snow Ball : Perhaps she is buried in the snow ! 

Tinkle: Oh no, no! Poor dolly! (Weeps.) 

High Jinx : Don't cry, Tinkle. We'll find her, I know. Mayhap 
these Snow Balls can help us. Can you ? 

They sing: 

What, what, can a Snow Ball do? 

We've been in the woods all day, it's true, 

But the first thing we've seen is you, 

So what in the can a Snow Ball do ? 

(They roll off stage singing gayly, "Roll, roll, in the soft, soft, 
snow," etc.) 

High Jinx: Come Tinkle, let us be searching. Maybe we will 
see some more inhabitants of the forest who can help us in our search. 
(They start to right.) 

(Enter Christmas Turkey.) 

Turkey : Gobble, gobble, gobble ! 

Tinkle: Oh! (Hides behind High Jinx.) 

High Jinx : (boldly) Good day, sir ! 

Turkey : Good day ! 

High Jinx : Pray, what are you doing in the wood, sir ? 



24 The St. Mart's Muse 



Turkey: I escaped from my coop just in time to avoid an un- 
timely death, sir. 

Tinkle : Untimely death ! Oh ! 

High Jinx : Explain yourself ! 

Turkey : I was fattened and fed for three weeks. All went well. 
I did not suspect any treachery until today, blind fool that I was. 
Then I heard the cook and kitchen maid plotting my ruin. I made 
my plans and escaped as speedily as possible. What a cruel fate I 
managed to avoid! 

Tinkle : Oh, I am so glad ! 

High Jinx: But have you seen anything of a little Christmas 
doll? 

Turkey : Hm ! No. I have seen only a woodman with an axe, 
and I avoided him right stealthily. 

Tinkle : Can you help us to find her ? 

Turkey: Hm! No. I have my own head to look out for. 
Gobble, gobble, gobble! (Exit.) 

High Jinx: The cold-hearted creature! I hope they catch him. 

Tinkle : Oh, High Jinx, don't say that ! 

High Jinx: Well, I do. How dark it is getting! Will there 
be no moon tonight ? 

Tinkle : Sh ! Someone is coming ! 

(Enter Night.) 

Night : I am Night. I enfold the earth in the starry folds of my 
mantle, and set free the perfume winds out of the western gates, to 
wander over the forests and meadows. 

High Jinx : But may we not seek further for the Christmas doll ? 

Night: Hush! No one is allowed to speak to me but the owl 
and the whippoorwill. 

(Tinkle and High Jinx stand speechless till Night Exits.) 

High Jinx : Come, Tinkle, let us rest behind this little bush until 
the moon comes up. 

(They sit down behind bush and go to sleep.) 

(Enter Christmas Doll.) 






The St. Maky's Muse 25 



Christmas Doll sings: 

I come from the place where Santa Claus 

Makes all the Christmas toys, 

To fill the empty stockings 

Of the little girls and boys. 

He had me in his Christmas pack, 

But somehow I fell out. 

I'm a lonesome Christmas dolly ! 

I'm a China doll, from the North Pole, far away, 

My curls are real and my pretty sash is gay, 

And I want to be a present for some one on Christmas Day — 

I'm afraid no one will find me ! 

(Walks to front of stage.) 

Christmas Doll: I'm so very, very tired! I've been wandering 
in the woods for ever so long, and it is in the night, now. Some 
dear little girl won't have a doll for Christmas morning. I think I 
will rest behind this bush — I'm so sleepy! Maybe someone will 
come soon. 

(Sits down behind bush on opposite side of stage from Tinkle and 
High Jinks, goes to sleep. ) 

(Singing in distance:) 

Heigho, the Christmas tree, 

To make the little Christmas girl gay. 

Heigho, the Christmas tree, 

Glad on Christmas day! 

(Enter Brownies, dragging Christmas tree.) 
First Brownie : Bless my soul ! See the tracks in the snow ! 
Second Brownie : And pray, what is this ? (Goes toward bush.) 
Why it's a doll ! 

All : The Christmas Doll ! 



26 The St. Maky's Muse 



(Tinkle and High Jinx wake up.) 

Tinkle : Oh ! 

High Jinx : Oh ! 

Together : Oh ! Oh ! 

Tinkle (sleepily) : Is it Christmas ? 

High Jinx (sadly) : We couldn't find the doll. 

Tinkle: We looked everywhere. 

First Brownie (who has helped the doll out of the snow) : Here 
she is ! 

Tinkle (running to her) : Aren't you frezzing, dear ? 

Christmas Doll : W-where am I ? I-I'm afraid ! 

Tinkle : Don't worry, dear Dolly. We'll take you back to Santa 
Claus. He has been so worried about you and we've been search- 
ing everywhere for you. 

Christmas Doll : It must me nearly morning. 
High Jinx : Yes and we must take you to Santa Claus right away. 
Come, let us be going. 

(Tinkle takes one arm, High Jinx the other, with two Brownies 
on each side. They sing : ) 

A southerly wind and a crimson sky 
Proclaim that Christmas is dawning; 
Before the day breaketh away we fly 
Haste thee, Oh haste thee, 'tis morning. 

Hark, hark, hark! 
The Christmas bells are ringing! 

Hark, hark, hark ! 
Welcome Christmas morn. 

(Tinkle of bells in distance.) 

(Curtain.) 



The St. Mary's Muse 27 



Act III. 

Scene: Interior of a humble cottage. Christmas tree, fireplace 
with glowing fire ; little girl with doll in big arm chair in front of fire. 
Music : "Home, sweet home." Little girl is sleeping. 

Voices in distance : 

"God rest you, merry gentlemen," etc. 

Enter Brownies, Bells, Santa Claus, Snow Balls, etc. Gather 
round chair with fingers to lips. Dance to front to stage and sing: 
"Merry, merry Christmas bells," etc. 

(Curtain.) 

Curtain goes up for a second. Each Brownie, Bell, etc., holds up 
a card with a letter on it. Santa Claus is in center. Letters spell : 

MEKRY CHRISTMAS 

(Curtain.) 

Cast of Characters 

The Christmas Doll Elizabeth Nolan 

The Little Girl Eleanor Cobb 

High Jinx Frances Venable 

Tinkle Katherine Waddell 

Santa Claus Fielding Douthat 

The Chistmas Turkey Florida Kent 

The White Rabbit Virginia Jordan 

„, „ . „ f Dobothy Kirtland 

The Snowballs { _ „ _ 

( Suzanne Pegues 

Night Mabel Mebbitt 

Susan Collier 
Mae Deaton 
Rebecca Hines 
Caroline Moore 
Katherine Waddell 
[ Elizabeth Nelson 
Eleanor Tiplady 

Christmas Brownies j Frances Venable 

Elizabeth Carrigan 
Miss Hesse 



Christmas Bells. 



28 The St. Mart's Muse 



SCHOOL NEWS 

The Studio Tea 

On November the eleventh a number of the friends of the Art 
Students received the following invitations : 

The Sketch Club will be "At Home" 
At half-past four, we hope you'll come, 
Just don't forget it's the wit that counts 
And come prepared to "use your ounce." 

The studio, which always has an atmosphere all its own, was un- 
usually attractive with its decorations of red and yellow autumn 
leaves. 

After the guests arrived and before the conversation had a chance 
to lag, Dorothy Kirtland, Katherine Waddell, Lucile Dempsey, 
Sophie Egleston and Sara Philips, representing the five great artists, 
Leonardo Da Vinci, Michael Angelo, Titian, Correggio and Kaphael 
respectively, appeared, attired in costumes a la sheet, and ludicrously 
mimicked and exaggerated the eccentricities of the Art Students. 

Then followed a contest displaying the artistic abilities of each 
person present. Paper pallets, pencils, and two of each number up 
to twenty-five were distributed. The people receiving corresponding 
numbers were asked to draw each other. Although there were a 
number of very good likenesses, Mr. Stone's of Miss Lee headed the 
list and he was awarded a handsome Ten Cent Store paint-box. 

After this the tea table, laden with attractive sups and autumn 
leaves, and presided over by Miss Fenner, became the center of 
attraction. Delicious sandwiches were served by the art students, 
who were dressed in bright colored smocks with white skirts. 

The guests were at liberty to wander at will about the Studio, and 
after viewing the works of art that adorned the walls, and much 
pleasant chatter, the guests made their adieu, thanking the Sketch 
Club for a very enjoyable afternoon. S. P. 



I 



The St. Mary's Muse 29 



Noyember 16-18 — The Model Meetings 

The first two "Model Meetings" were held in the parlor on Tues- 
day and Thursday evenings, November 16 and 18. According to 
the arrangement the Sigma Lambdas held the first meeting. 

Elizabeth Carrigan, the Sigma Lambda president, called the meet- 
ing to order and gracefully presided. After the roll call and the 
reading of the minutes of the last meeting, the business was discussed. 
The chairmen of the program and membership committees made 
their reports. Frances Venable, chairman of the preliminary debate 
committee, spoke very encouragingly of the work done in this direc- 
tion. After a brief summary of the current events of the week by 
Margaret Huske, the president announced that "Indians" was the 
subject of the program. The entire program was interesting and 
well rendered. Dorothy Baum talked on Indian Legends in her most 
winning and enthusiastic manner. Selections from Hiawatha's 
Childhood were vividly and sympathetically recited by Mary Louise 
Everett. The other numbers on the program, which were also very 
entertaining, were: 

Sun Worshippers Chorus 

Land of Sky Blue Water Katherine MacAllister 

After this the meeting adjourned. Everyone was very much 
elated over the first model meeting. The entire audience voted it a 
very enjoyable program. 

On Thursday evening the E. A. P. society held the second meeting. 
Erom start to finish the meeting reflected the time and labor that had 
been spent in its preparation. It was thoroughly business-like. The 
rendering of their business could not have been improved upon. The 
topics discussed were vital and interesting ones and the members gave 
the real zest by their enthusiastic and intelligent discussions. Louise 
Egleston told of the work that had been done on the Muse. Their 
most important item, which was a suggestion that a loving cup be 
awarded to the society victorious in the inter-society contest, culmi- 
nated in the appointing of a committee to discuss it with the Sigma 



30 The St. Mart's Muse 



Lambdas. The program which consisted of four numbers on "Gyp- 



sies was : 



G yP sies - Sophie Egleston 

Kipling's Gypsy Trail Evelina Beckwith 

G yP sie s Dorothy Kirtland 

Gypsy Love Song Chorus 

Sophie Egleston spoke with much poise. Evelina Beckwith won 
the applause of the audience by her sweet rendering of "Gypsy 
Trail." The meeting adjourned after the singing of the E. A. P. 
song. 

Soon after the conclusion of the meeting, the decision of the judges 
was announced to be unanimously in favor of the E. A. P. society. 
This victory put quite a feather in their cap and will give much en- 
couragement to their new members. The order and business of their 
meeting, and the interesting way in which the participants rendered 
their selections well merited their success. This is the first of the 
contests between the two societies for the year and gives the E. A. P. 
a lead of fifteen points. Let the Sigma Lambdas look to their laurels 
and the E. A. P. keep up their good work, for the contest bids fair to 
be a very close one. g_ ]\£ q 

First Basket Ball Game 

After days of hot discussion between Sigmas and Mus as to who 
would be the winner of the first games of the season, the excited mem- 
bers of the two associations met in the Gym on Saturday, the 20th of 
November, for the first double-header, the Eirst and Third Team 
games. Fate seemed to be trembling in the balance, and each side 
was anxious to make its "rep" by winning the first games toward 
basket-ball championship. 

The Third Teams were the first on the court, each going with the 
evident intention of fighting it out to the finish. Indeed this was 
necessary from the beginning, for the teams were well matched. The 
Sigmas, however, had better pass work and at the end of the first half 
the score stood nine to three in their favor. During the second half 



The St. Mary's Muse 31 



;he Mus picked up. Eva Lee Glass won the Mus' applause for her 
splendid work in the center, while Hannah Lilly's sure aim raised the 
Sigma's excitement to its highest pitch. All of the players, many of 
whom were new girls, worked hard, giving their associations every 
reason to be proud of them. The final score, scarcely heard for the 
nthusiastic yells, was announced 14 to 10 in the Sigma's favor. 

Following was the line-up : 

Sigma Mu 

Hairston / Centers ' Glass 



Phillips j J Gould 

Lill y ! Forwards j McC °y 

Chandler j | Thigpen 

D - Nixon I Guards j Nolan 

Pegues f i V. Wilkins 



The First Teams were fortunate in having every player in the 
2jame and in requiring no substitutes for either half. Well matched 
and each eager for victory, the opposing teams kept the ball going 
back and forth, from guards to centers, to forwards, and so on. Dur- 
ing the first half the suspense was intense, the score at the end of the 
half being 14 to 12 in the Mus' favor. But in the second half Bessie 
Brown just "rolled 'em in" so frequently that the Mu score was soon 
too far ahead to create suspense, at least not on the winning side. 
On the Sigma's side Madge Blakely starred as forward and Mary 
Louise Everett and Dorothy Baum as guards. Harriet Barber, as 
usual, held clown the center for the Mus, and Lois Dunnock, especially 
gjood at keeping the ball with the Mu forwards, made some splendid 
shots and showed excellent team work with the other Mu forward, 
Bessie Brown. "Budge's" insistent "time up" brought the game to 
an abrupt close. The score was announced 36 to 16 in favor of the 
Mus. After a few scattering cheers for their opponents and for the 



32 The St. Mary's Muse 



teams, the Sigmas and Mus went out eagerly discussing the gam. 
just over and those in prospect, and the crowd dispersed. 

The line-up was os follows : 
Sigma Mu 

Ballou ] Centers (Kent 



Hawkins j j Barber 

™*\ 0Wn I • Forwards. j B.Brown 

Blakely J j Dunnock 

^ Verett I Guards j Venable 

Baum j | Villepigue 

The new cheer leaders elected by each association and who directed 
the yells with great success are as follows : Sara Keller and Marietta 
Gareissen for the Mus; Martha Best, Eunice Collier and Susamu 
Pegues for the Sigmas. j\ X 

The Circus 

On Saturday night, November 25, the " World's Greatest Circus," 
whose arrival had been heralded by a gay poster on the bulletin board, 
gave a most entertaining performance. The circus ground — we can- 
not call it "Gym," so disguised was it by circus paraphernalia — was 
the scene of much excitement when the "flap to the main tent," in 
other words the sheets over the door, was lifted and disclosed to thei 
expectant crowd a real sawdust ring. A special band, Pied Piperji 
Junior, directed by Mabel Hawkins, had been procured for the occa 
sion and was enlivening the whole atmosphere with its latest musica 
hits. Dorothy Baum, the eloquent ring master, came out and made 
most dramatic speech about the wonders of the performances which 1 
were to follow. First on the program were the fetching young horse- 
back riders, Miles. Caroline Moore and Hamlin Landis, who gave a 
graceful demonstration of bareback riding. Their steeds, imported 
stick horses of Arabian stock, were managed perfectly by these skilf 
ful ladies. Next, two marvelously trained monkeys, By Gosh an 
By Jingo, Miles. Dougherty and Gareissen respectively, won grea 



The St. Mary's Muse 



applause as with much ease and rapidity they ascended a perilous 
rope and went through all manner of tricks. No circus is complete 
without its clown, and this circus possessed a most extraordinary one 
in the person of Hobo, who afterwards proved to be Dorothy Kirt- 
land. Hobo made his triumphal entrance in a barrel and brought 
forth roars of laughter by his ludicrous attempts at getting his feet 
disentagled, and by various other pranks and mishaps. Then came 
the remarkable "Acrobats of Pedagogy," who came leaping in and 
went through a series of hair-raising and difficult stunts. One mem- 
ber of the troupe, Boykin, covered "himself" 1 with glory and sawdust, 
by his remarkable and miraculous back bending feats. 

Following this was an intermission. The audience was given the 
opportunity to "take in" the sideshows. One end of the circus ground 
was curtained off, and such sights and sounds there were behind these 
curtains ! The Wild Woman, the Fat Lady, Swimming Match, Cig- 
arette Fiend and others came up to the highest expectations aroused 
by the posters in front. Outside the sideshow tent, the cries of the 
ice-cream venders and peanuts and pop-corn ladies drew the crowd to 
their booths. The appetizing odors from the hot dog stand was ad- 
vertisement enough, and the memory of Thanksgiving boxes was 
effaced as all clamored for the refreshments so attractively offered. 

Soon the King Master's whistle summoned the crowd back to the 
ring, and munching peanuts, the spectators pressed forward with 
much interest to see what new marvel would present itself. Slowly 
the elephant ambled into the ring, led by the ape, and was made to 
dance and cut capers. This elephant, Elizabeth Thomas and Eliza- 
beth Carrigan, the strangest in captivity, obeyed no human voice and 
hence the ape, Virginia Weymouth, was trained to give orders. 
Maud, a most realistic donkey, was coaxed in by a red and white 
clown, Fielding Douthat. Prizes were offered to anyone who could ride 
Maud, but there were not many volunteers after the first two or three 
would-be riders were pitched unmercifully to the sawdust. A blood- 
curdling, hair-raising race between the hare and the tortoise, Susan 
Collier and Susan Fitchett, took place. These animals were descend- 
ents of the original racers made famous in history. As in the fable, 



34 The St. Mart's Muse 



the tortoise came out victorious, and was presented with a silver lov- 
ing cup. 

Loud screams of "It's loose!" were heard from the region back of 
the ring, and Hobo came dashing out pursued by Dempsey, the black 
cat, a most ferocious animal. After the two disturbers had been; 
hustled out of the way, Polly of the Circus, Elizabeth Lawrence, | 
danced most charmingly. 

As a grand finale, the entire troupe of performers, circus people 
and animals, paraded around the ring, and in a most appropriate 
speech the King master bade farewell to the appreciative audience. 
Thus in a final burst of jazz the performance was at an end. 

F. P. V. 

Noyemfoer 4th — The Class Parties 

On Saturday evening, November 4th, the Sophomores were invited 
by the Seniors to a "good time" in the parlor. The room was dec- 
orated with autumn leaves and pine, giving it a festive atmosphere. 
During the evening, between the dancing, a flower contest was held. 
Each girl was to fill in the missing link of Mary's diary with the 
name of an appropriate flower. Miss Bottum's botany pupils here 
showed their superior knowledge of "things botanical." So many 
of the wise Sophomores proved efficient, that the twenty perfect ones 
were obliged to draw for the lucky number. Eva Lee Glass was the 
fortunate one, and the prize was a dainty framed verse. After this 
delicious sandwiches and punch were served. During the evening 
the Pied Piper Junior furnished music which was greatly enjoyed 
by the guests. All too soon the bell rang, and the Sophomores bade 
their hostesses good-night, declaring they had spent a delightful 
evening. 

Meanwhile, in the lobby upstairs, Old Mother Goose reigned. 
The Juniors had invited the Freshmen : 

Freshmen, girls and boys, come out and play, 
The moon doth shine as bright as day. 
Come with a whoop, come with a call; 
Come with a good will, or not at all! 



The St. Mary's Muse 35 



Jack, the Pumpkin Eater, Little Miss Muffet, Bo-Peep, Little Ked 
Fading Hood, Little Boy Blue, and many more of Mother Goose's 
characters appeared as mortals for a short time. 

Eose lights shed a soft glow, and the decorations of holly lent the 
Spirit of Christmas, as well as the contest, that of pinning on Old 
Kris Kr ingle's tongue. Kachel Moore finally found his mouth, and 
received as her reward a dainty box of powder. 

Huge sticks of peppermint, the joy of the owners and the envy of 
the rest, were dispersed by Margaret Huske, costumed as the Old 
Woman in the Shoe, and her helpers attired as her family. Mabel 
Hawkins and her accommodating Pied Piper, Jr., added to the en- 
joyment of all. The dancing continued until the first flash, when 
the Mother Goose folk, like elves at the first bird call, reluctantly 
retired to the pages of Mother Goose. 

Down in the gym the Preps, according to the custom of many 
years, entertained themselves. Attired as little boys and girls, they 
enjoyed themselves hugely. Dancing and two contests were the 
program of the evening. The first contest was that of pinning the 
elusive tail on Master Bunny. This a young visitor from Raleigh 
accomplished, winning a cupid as prize. Then blind-folded, each 
person tried to hit a bag of peanuts, which difficult feat was accom- 
plished by another of the young visitors. 

Peanuts, popcorn, the infants joy, all-day suckers, the ever wel- 
come ice cream sandwiches, and the forbidden joy of chewing gum 
were indulged in. The Pied Piper Juniors, who rightfully belong- 
to the Preps, furnished the latest jazz music for dancing. 

E. L. G. 

December 11th — Sigmas Win Second Team Game 

On Saturday night, December 11th, the second teams met for 
their first conflict of the season. All the members of both teams 
were on the floor and showed the result of much practice. Daisy 
Cooper played an unusually good game and bids fair to make a 
reputation on account of her athletic ability. Marjorie ISFixon and 
Minette Thompson responded almost every time to the Sigma yell, 



The St. Maky's Muse 



"Oh, the Sigmas must have one more goal before we go away." The 
sureness of Nixon's aim in throwing long distance goals was the 
outstanding feature of the game. Both teams had snappy, quick 
pass work. Margaret Wood and Julia Winston Ashworth starred 
for the Mus. The game resulted in a score of 14 to 23 in the 
Sigma's favor. 

The line-up was as follows : 
Sigma Mu 

Powell, M. ) _ Centerg _ (Nelson 



Boykin, F. j 1 Wood > M 

Nixon, M. 1 .Forwards. ( Gareissen 



Thompson j "j Langley 

Cooper ) .Guards. (Ashworth 



Yarborough ( ) Gilchrist 

S. M. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse 37 



NEWS ITEMS 

We have been glad to welcome back a large number of the members 
of the class of '20. Every one of them has been with us for at least a 
day or two with the exception of Patty Sherrod, Sara Davis and 
Eugenia Thomas. Nancy Lay, Jane Toy and Nina Cooper were 
among our latest visitors. They came for the first basket-ball game, 
and stayed over the week-end. "Muffins" paid us a visit on the 
twenty-seventh of November, and was here for the Circus. We hardly 
dare call "Muffins" other than "Miss Moffit" now, as she tells us that 
she is a dignified "school marm." 

Thanksgiving was a holiday much enjoyed by everybody, and the 
service in the chapel was an appropriate beginning of a happy day. 
Everybody paused a minute to think of the things we have to be thank- 
ful for, before entering into the festivities of the day. Numerous 
and bounteous were the "feasts" that everybody attended. Every- 
thing good to eat that can be imagined abounded in school on that 
day and for many days after, for it seemed that every girl's mother 
had given special attention to the preparation of the one and only 
"box" her hungry daughter could have during the year besides at 
Easter. We hope we will be remembered as bountifully then ! 

Miss Davis and her Private-Expression pupils deserve praise for 
the little play, "The Ladies of Cranford," which was given in the 
Auditorium on November 18th. Fielding Douthat was especially 
good as "Miss Mattie," and Margery Wilkins won applause as her 
maid. All of the cast took their parts cleverly. The play was amus- 
ing and entertaining as was evinced by the appreciation of the audi- 
ence. 

We have acquired at last a thing that we have long been striving 
for, and that is a uniform, well made chapel cap of mohair. The non- 
descript head gear, ranging from a middy tie to a georgette hat, is a 
thing of the past, and we certainly make a more presentable appear- 
ance in chapel than formerly. 



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Right merrily she tripped along, 
Yet, alas! she was not 
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Jttfo4B2Imter J|um&er 

3fanuar?^ebrttarj>, 1921 



Scbool CaleQdar, 1920-21 



January 4th to Easter 

January 4, Tuesday— ^School duties resumed after holidays. 

January 10, Monday — Peace-St. Mary's concert. Miss Rumsey. 

January 15, Saturday — Basketball. First and third teams. 

January 17, Monday — Schumann-Heink concert. 

January 20-22, Thursday-Saturday— Mid-term examinations. 

January 29, Saturday — Return class parties. 

February 5, Saturday — Kreisler concert. 

February 7, Monday — "Stunt Night." 

February 8, Tuesday — Shrove Tuesday. Colonial Ball. 

February 9, Wednesday— Ash Wednesday. Lent begins. 

February 10-March 27 — Lenten season. Special services. 

Talks by Rector — Wednesday and Friday afternoons. 

Morning Watch — Wednesday and Friday mornings. 

Mission Study Classes— Friday evenings. 
February 19, Saturday— Basketball. Second teams. 
March 3, Thursday— Annual Inter-Society debate. 
March 10-15, Thursday-Tuesday— Spring holidays. 
March 20, Sunday— Palm Sunday. 
March 27, Sunday— Easter. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Literary Department: 

Dot's Diary and Dick (Story) Julia Andrews Marks 3 

Home (Sketch) Louise Egleston 8 

The Sieve (Poem) Louise Egleston 10 

"You Can't Change a Nigger" (Playlet) Elizabeth Cheek 14 

Editorial 22 

School News: 

The Play 25 

"The Night Before Christmas" 26 

Preps Entertain 27 

The Christmas Recital 28 

Peace-St. Mary's Concert 29 

The Great Snow War 30 

The Fashion Show 31 

Sophomores to the Seniors 32 

Freshman Junior Party 33 

Stunt Night 34 

The Colonial Ball 35 

Alumnae Matters: 

The Campaign for the St. Mary's Fund 36 

Progress of the National Campaign 37 

The Faculty Recitals 38 



The St. Mary's Muse 

MID-WINTER NUMBER 



Vol. XXVI January-February, 1921 No. 4 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 

Edited by the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society 
Louise A. Egleston, Editor 



Dot's Diary ar)d DicK 

Julia Andrews Marks 

Dear Diary: — It is September 6th, and Myra's last night here. 
Am. I sorry she is going home tomorrow ? I cannot say that I am. 
She is on the porch now with Dick. They're eating up all the candy 
that Bob gave me and she is pretending it's hers. I thought it was 
a joke at first when I let her wear Dick's Kappa Sig. pin. But it isn't 
a joke any more. He has not even noticed that I have stopped wearing 
it and he thinks she is "an adorable vampire" (he said so not five 
minutes ago), because she has her ring and pin and my two pins. 
I declare, the only way to keep a man interested is by making him 
think there is a whole tribe of others interested too. Horrors ! She 
is kissing him good-night ! Alas ! Maybe he is kissing her ! Oh, 
again ! Ye gods ! I must run to bed now. It would be terrible 
for her to come upstairs and find me sitting here on the top step 
writing up my diary. She thinks diaries are silly anyway. 

September 7. — Well, I am furious ! I feel like knocking out a 
window, or getting drunk, or doing something perfectly unspeakable. 
I Dick asked Myra last night to let him take us to the train, so she 
I begged me to let her keep my pin till we got to the station. She 
promised to slip it to me then, so I had to let her wear it. She 
returned my other one, just some little old aviator's wings which 
used to look pretty before she wore all the silver polish off of them, 
so I wore those. Well, we rode to the station, and I sat alone on the 



The St. Mary's Muse 



back seat just like I was the washerwoman, or chaperone, or most 
anything. Isn't that insulting ? In the excitement of saying good- 
bye, she absolutely refused to understand what I meant when 
I winked at my pin. My efforts to secure my lost jewelry were 
ignored. Now she will go home and tell everybody that that pin 
"belongs to the darlingest Kappa Sig. she ever saw" — and I guess 
that's true. When we had told Myra and the pin goodbye, I was 
so exasperated I wouldn't say a word. Then, what do you think? 
Just because I was the only girl in sight, Dick began paying atten- 
tion to me. He paid so much attention, in fact, that he discovered 
I wasn't wearing his pin. I made up some little white lies about 
having forgotten it for once. He didn't like that, so we fussed. 
I hope I'll never see him again. I've found out what a flirt he is 
and I guess he was getting ready to ask for his old pin so he could 
send it to Myra, too, but I stopped speaking to him, so he couldn't 
ask for it. 

September 8. — Dick called up today and I answered the phone, 
but I had him told that I was out, because I cannot explain the thing 
to him. Mother has almost decided to let me go to New York for 
a month or two with Aunt Dorothy. I have changed my mind about 
staying at home, too. Eighteen is really awful young for a girl to 
start spending her winters at home. It's so suggestive. 

September 9. — Bought a new evening dress today for the dance 
tomorrow night. Certainly am glad Myra won't be there. It's 
nerve-wracking, to say the least, to have a popular visitor whom you 
are in duty bound to introduce to every boy present, although you are 
perfectly sure that she will literally kidnap all the desirable ones. 
Well, I guess I'll have a few faithful Fidos, myself, when they see 
that blue and gold tulle I'm going to "sic" them with tomorrow night. 
I'll wear my aviator's wings pinned at the top of my dress in the 
back, so they'll think me utterly indifferent to men and the jewelry, 
which shows their love. Then, when they dance with me, I will 
contradict all those ideas with a smile. Men do so love women who 
keep them guessing. 

September 10. — Oh, if I could only dance all night I'd be com- 
pletely happy ! I'm dead tired, but it was marvelous ! Dick came 



The St. Mary's Muse 



to the dance and stayed about fifteen minutes. He didn't want to 
speak to me but I was chatting with three of the choicest ones by the 
punch bowl the whole time he was there. He could not bear to leave 
without getting any punch, so we had to speak to each other, as we 
are both conservative and like to avoid scenes in public. However, 
he only said, "Hey, Dot, I'm going out of town." I said, "Hey, so 
am I." Anyway, the dance was grand ! Good-night ! 

September 11. — Arose at twelve this morning, as is proper for 

society ladies. After lunch mother and I went shopping and I bought 

a suit, dress and hat, and will get anything else I need in New York. 

I Now, I do not mind saying that's some class for a girl who never has 

; been to New York, and it is positively decided today that I am going. 

September 12. — Mother and I went to see Aunt Dorothy this 

morning and had more fun talking about our trip. She had some 

1 elegant clothes and we are planning to stay at The Biltmore, which 

will break papa absolutely. We leave on the 19th. Oh, goody! 

Just a week longer. Went with Eva this afternoon to the vaudeville. 

She had a date last night with Dick and bragged about it the whole 

time. Girls who do that way make me sick. 

Sunday, September 13. — Went to church and Dick sat right across 
the aisle from us. But he is a Baptist and cannot keep up with us 
Episcopals kneeling and standing up so much. It was funny, and 
unfortunately, I nearly got the giggles when I looked at him once, 
when we were praying. He was gazing all around with his eyes 
and mouth wide open (he's so afraid he will miss something some- 
time) , and he saw me watching him. Now, he thinks I was smiling 
at him and trying to make up. It is a pity boys can't tell when 
a girl is laughing at them from when she is smiling at them. 

We had turkey, ice cream, and the general Sunday dinner, which 
is had in all the best families, so we asked Aunt Dorothy over and 
talked some more about New York and how many trunks I should 
take. We had not thought fit to consider that until she asked the 
question as I was planning to take only my steamer trunk. Oh, yes, 
and a suit-case, of course, as I will have an upper birth, so can't dress 
and fix my hair up there, though I'm imagining it will be awful to 
walk up the aisle in one's kimono. I thought no more boys were 



The St. Mary's Muse 



ever coming to this house since Myra left, but one did come tonight. 
He wasn't cute, but he brought some candy. 

September 14. — Went to Downing's clearance sale of summer 
lingerie this morning and bought enough to last all winter. Went to 
Kresses and bought pins, wash rags, hair pins, hair nets, garters, etc., 
enough to go to Europe with. This afternoon I turned up the hem 
in my last winter's dress and retrimmed my last winter's hat, which 
always did look good on me. 

September 15. — Eva and I shopped this morning and went to the 
"movies." She had another date with Dick last night and he told her 
he was going to New York on the 19th. She didn't say anything 
about me, 'cause she knew we were mad. She says, "He's darling 
and has such a precious line." Well, I guess he is trying to make me 
jealous, rushing her so. Anyway, I hope that is it. Dance tomorrow 
night, but I'm not a bit excited. 

September 16. — Punk dance. Everybody was good to me but Dick 
and he didn't come near me. He stayed the whole time, too. 

September 17. — Heard from Myra today. Says she had a wonder- 
ful time visiting me ; never can thank me enough. I must come and see 
her soon and, "Please, dearie, let me keep the pin to wear to the 
Kappa Sig. dance next Tuesday night. Honestly, I didn't mean to 
keep it so long, but you and Dick are mad, anyway, aren't you? 
Thank you so much, darling! I know you're having a wonderful 
time," etc. Now, isn't that the limit ! 

September 18. — Packed my trunk today. Terribly excited over 
that and also over Shaky McKeever, whom I had a date with tonight. 
All the girls are crazy about him and I think I'll rave over him 
awhile. One has to have some one to rave over and Shaky is a 
wonderful dancer and adores me. He told me so and he looked like 
he meant it, too. We leave tomorrow ! Thrills ! Thrills ! Thrills ! 

September 19. — On the train — which is jogging my pencil 
terribly. Well, Dick phoned this morning to tell me that he was 
going to New York and to say goodbye. Eva had not told him I was 
going, too. So he said, "How charming!" but was secretly very 
much surprised and disappointed, as he was only phoning to see if 
I would mention the frat pin, I think. Well, I didn't. So here we 



The St. Mary's Muse 



are, jogging along in the same car, he mostly in the smoker, but 
speaking accommodatingly when he passes occasionally, and me sit- 
ting here reading magazines and writing as hard as I can. Travel- 
ing is real exciting but I sure do wish mother and papa were here, 
too. 

September 21. — The Biltmore — Dear little diary: You sure have 
had some experience. You precious thing ! And my darling suit- 
case, too. I never knew before that it was just like Dick's, same 
color, same shape, same initials, same size, everything! Oh, isn't 
it wonderful ! But, suppose I hadn't put my diary in the darling 
suit-case. Then Dick's getting the two mixed up and taking mine 
instead of his would not have done any good at all. Oh, I'm so glad 
he isn't so honorable that he won't read young ladies' diaries when 
they are thrust into his hands. Of course, I was awful worried last 
night, 'cause I didn't know where he was staying, but when he 
phoned this morning and said he found our address in something 
(emphasis on the something) in the suit-case, everything was all 
right. I'm going to write Myra for my pin tomorrow. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



"Home" 

Louise Egleston 

The doors of shops, factories, offices, department stores, banks and 
nameless dozens of nondescript places were thrown open to pour onto 
the already densely crowded streets of a big city their additional mass 
of busy or shiftless, eager or worn, rich or poor, wise or foolish 
humanity. It was six o'clock in the afternoon and to every nook and 
corner of the city pressed on some expectant soul — home! 

And as I watched I began to visualize the receptions of a few of 
the innumerable mass. Home waited for most of them. But what 
kind of a home ? A big home or a rude apology ? A happy home, 
or one maybe not all sunshine ? A home with mother and father, 
brothers and sisters, or one room in a tenement with only oneself — 
but still "home" ? There was no way of telling, but I looked on and 
let my mind picture the answers at will. 

That pale wisp of a girl crossing the street there ! Blue serge suit 
and black hat but a sweet pretty face. I could see her behind a type- 
writer all day, pink finger tips skillfully playing to the tune of 
twenty-five dollars a week. And at home, tired, sweet little mother 
in her faded lavendar gingham, waiting for six o'clock and 
Maisie. Cheap white enameled furniture they had. But two nice 
sunny rooms and only three flights to get to them ! A few treasured 
pictures, albums and their family Bible, with a few prized books 
Maisie had collected ; that was all, but there was a fire-place, a pretty 
fire in the winter, and mother. It was home ! 

Just behind her another woman hurried along; rather unsteadily 
she walked on the little French heels and very high she tilted a proud 
little head under the mass of brown feathers some milliner had 
christened "hat." And under her arm she carried a neatly wrapped, 
but unmistakably "market-like" parcel. A steak for herself and 
"Jim," I guessed at once ! To be cooked on a shiny oil stove in the 
kitchenette of the dearest little flat in the world. To be eaten by 
the adoring Jim with the verdict that his little bride was "the best 
little housekeeper in the world — made even a two-by-four flat a 
'Home'." 



I 



The St. Mary's Muse 9 



"Extra ! Extra !" a little newsboy called in my ears, and I glanced 
casually in the direction of the poor little street Arab. A man, very 
much excited over the latest from the press, stepped from a limousine 
at the curb, signalled his chauffeur to wait, pressed a nickel into the 
hand of the eager paper merchant, took the last of the "Extras" and 
was off in the car again. Only a moment the stunted little fellow 
stood gazing after the luxurious car, with a mixture of longing and 
envy in his sharp brown eyes ; and then, the last of his wares dis- 
posed of, pocketed the nickel with satisfaction and whistling a cheery 
tune disappeared down a side street — home ! 

What a difference in the paths of the two! The man to a great 
big house, all shiny floors, big mirrors, pictures, books, rugs and 
padded chairs ! The boy to a cellar probably or a crowded ground 
floor room. Straw mattress and a ragged quilt for his bed, and only 
a slice of bread and a sausage for his dinner. But to each his destina- 
tion was his own place in the great world of a city — home, and where 
his treasure was there was his heart also. 

And there were many more, each intent on reaching only the place 
where there was some one, something to greet him — every nook and 
corner known and loved ; every article bound with associations, with 
memories, with links of love to one's own existence. Where the world 
might be for a time forgotten ; where toil and care might cease ; where 
rest and love and joy and peace — 

But what a long time I had been standing on that corner, dreaming 
away the daylight in the lives of others ! It was past my dinner 
hour now ! And rousing my thoughts and weary limbs I, too, remem- 
bered that I must go — home ! 



10 The St. Mary's Muse 



"THE SIEVE" 

It's the little bit of metal 

That their "safety" hinges on; 
It's a nuisance when they have it 

But a jewel when it's gone. 
It's the bane of their existence, 

To the Seniors, one and all; 
But they couldn't do without it — 

"It's" the key to Senior Hall! 

It's the care of everybody; 

It's the property of none; 
But it makes the rounds quite often 

To the Seniors, every one. 
And it's hard on that young lady, 

Who is always last to leave, 
As the dinner j bell is ringing — 

Such instructions to receive: 

"Now be sure and lock the door; 

Keep the key yourself; and mind 
That the chapel caps and sweaters 

And the spats aren't left behind!" 
So the door is banged behind her, 

And the ribbon 'round her neck, 
Makes the wearer just a footman 

Answering every Senior's beck. 

But her stewardship is over 

Far too soon for every one; 
And the "Class Will" gives the Juniors — 

(When the Seniors' year is done — ) 
Solemn trust to guard this relic 

With their lives — whate'er befall; 
And they really part regretful 

With the key to Senior Hall! 

— Louise A. Egleston. 



Silence reigned in the study hall as Miss Stone went to the front 
of the room. 

"Will the following young ladies please arise as their names are 
called ?" she said, and started reading her list. 

"Ashworth, Boykin, Cabell, Cheek — " 



The St. Mary's Muse 11 



"What does this mean?" I asked the girl next to me, as I arose. 
She did not know. 

"I know what it is," I eagerly whispered, "we are going to be 
excused from study hall ! Won't that be wonderful ? Could it be 
really possible?" Many thoughts of things I could do in my room 
passed quickly through my mind. 

Suddenly Miss Stone stopped reading. 

"These young ladies are to go to the Senior Study Room." 

Elizabeth Cheek. 

What a queer, unearthly smell! And what equally queer, un- 
earthly looking little instruments ! I was in "chemistry lab." for 
the first time, and my weak heart, that trembled when I attempted 
to light the gas range at home, nigh gave way and collapsed in the 
face of these new and untried horrors. I examined the laboratory 
manual; that seemed to be what others were doing. It directed us 
to set a match to the burner. I shuddered. And yet there was noth- 
ing else to do. Steeling myself for a possible explosion, I fearfully 
turned the little — oh, what do you call it ? Then I, slowly and with 
painful care, brought the lighted match to the burner. I closed my 
eyes; held my breath — waited. At length I took courage and ven- 
tured a look. I was relieved ! A harmless yellow flame greeted my 
eyes. The terrors of "chemistry lab." are not so great, after all ! 

Lenore Powell. 

All was excitement in the "gym." For it was quite an important 
time, if one should judge from the tense expressions on the faces of 
the girls gathered in two huge groups of red and blue. I asked one 
of the girls what it was all about and she answered me, with one eye 
on the game : "My dear, we are playing for basketball championship, 
and when time was called, the score was tied!" 

Just then a howl of triumph issued from the Reds but ceased sud- 
denly, for the ball had only gone on the edge of the basket. Another 
few moments of tense silence, a struggle, and then the Blues nearly 
went frantic, for the ball flew from the hands of the forward and 



12 The St. Mary's Muse 

straight through the basket. The roar was deafening, but above all 

could be heard — 

"Rah, rah, rah, rah, rah, 
Rah, rah, rah, rah, rah, 
Rah, rah, rah, rah, rah, 
Mus! Mus! Mus! 

Evelina Beck with. 

Miss Davis (In Expression) : "Breathe in, now out, hold it, keep 

on holding it ! Now with a hissing sound through the teeth. That's 

the way, don't use your shoulders! Let your arms relax. Good! 

Arms down. One, two, three, four, raising them. Out this way. 

Now pushing forward, down, down ! Push out your chest. There 

go your shoulders again! Keep them still! Now keep right on 

doing it, I've got to go to the Study Hall." 

Margaeet Beown. 

Many, many years ago, when our great-great-grandmothers were 
tiny little girls, there lived in far Japan a princess of great beauty 
and grace, but marred by an extremely red nose, the despair of her 
father and his court. All of the wise men of the kingdom had tried 
all sorts of cures, but to no avail. 

One day the princess was wandering through her father's vast 
estates and she saw some little boys pounding rice into a fine powder. 
It looked so cool and soft that she put her hands in it and rubbed 
her hands on her face, for the day was very warm. Just then her 
father chanced to come that way, and at the sight of her threw up 
his hands in astonishment and loudly exclaimed : 

"My beautiful daughter, the gods have indeed been good to us, 
for your nose is like a snow-white lily !" 

When the cause of this sudden transformation was discovered, the 

king and his subjects were greatly rejoiced. And from that day to 

this, every woman has endeavored to make herself beautiful by the 

use of powder. 

Evelina Beckwith. 

"Step lively, please/' said the conductor to me, as I was getting 
on a Fifth Avenue bus. Of all things, I hate those words ; especially 



The St. Mary's Muse 13 



when I, a Southerner, am trying to walk as fast as those Northerners. 

Nevertheless, I kept on climbing up the funny little steps, and took 

one of the first seats. I was alone and was doing everything in my 

power to keep from appearing "green." I was gazing at the high 

buildings and enormous crowds, when all of a sudden I was scared 

almost out of my wits. At first I thought some one had poked an 

automatic revolver at me. After a few minutes I realized that 

I had not paid my fare. Examining the thing closely and very 

quickly I found a place to stick my dime in. I felt much better. 

We rode and rode. I decided that I had better get off. Where was 

that bell? I couldn't find it. It seemed as if I punched every 

button, screw or nail in sight, but none of them would ring. At last 

I found the right one. The bus stopped and I descended those tiny 

steps. Just as I was stepping off the last step the conductor said, 

"Step lively, please." 

Emily E. Hakt. 



A Valentine 

I love you! All my world of life and gladness 
I send in these three words to touch your heart; 

And should you doubt their burning truth, my darling, 
Then doubt that love is of this life a part! 

I love you! through the cycle of the ages 

Has rung this key-note of the human soul; 
And should you think to question that devotion — 

Then doubt that love is of this life the whole! 

Louise Egleston. 



14 The St. Mary's Muse 



A One-act Play 
"You Can't Change a Nigger" 

Elizabeth Cheek 
Cast of Characters 






Hattie Foster — A respectable old negro woman of about fifty. 
Teeley — Her daughter. 
Mamie Merman — Hattie's niece. 
Ada Henderson — A young negro. 
Dr. Samuel Baxter — Teeley's husband. 

Charles and Virginia Jones — Two small children of Colonel Jones, whom 
Hattie has served faithfully as cook for fifteen years. 

(Scene. — Living-i-oom, sitting-room, dining-room, pantry and kitchen in 
serving ability but, in reality, one room of Hattie Foster's three-room, dwell- 
ing. In the middle of the floor stands a table covered with a bright red' 
fringed table-cloth on which there are pieces of bright-colored china. Directly 
bach of the table there is a large cook stove, a cupboard and smaller table are 
on the left and a lounge on the right. The chairs, consisting of the rockers 
of the auction sale type, and four straight ones, are scattered about the. 
room. Enlarged portraits in fancy gilded frames and a profusion of adver- 
tisement calendars adorn the walls. Enough cheap finery is scattered about 
through the room to make it appear unmistakably "niggery" Hattie, irA - 
a dress of plain black material, stands mixing a cake at the table by the 
cupboard. Mamie Merman is sitting by the stove with her hands stretched 
out to warm them.) 

Mamie : Well, Aunt Hattie, jest two more days 'fore Easter. 

Hattie : Yes, honey, so it is, don't time fly ? I sez to myself this 
very morning, "Hattie Foster, if you don't bake your cake this here 
evening it won't get baked," for tomorrow I'se going to start baking 
them at the house. De governor is coming and all his family and 
I know Miss Maria would have a plumb fit if I warn't there. You 
see, child, for fifteen years I been there. Dem raisin cakes, and 
marshmello ones I makes — 

Mamie Merman (jumping up) : Lands a living, Aunt Hattie, 
what's dat you putting in dat cake ? 

Hattie Foster (picking up bottle) : Have mercy ! (Looking at 
name on bottle in her hand and reading aloud) : "Dr. Pinkston's 
Linement !" Ain't I sumpin ? Here I is standing up here bragging 



The St. Mary's Muse 15 



'bout how I makes cakes at Colonel Jones' and had the stopper out of 
the linement bottle ready to put in my own cake for vanilla. I sho' 
is glad you told me, honey, for I wouldn't have mint this cake for 
nothing. This here linement has been setting right here on the shelf 
ever since my Teeley sprained her wrist. Wait 'till I get this in the 
stove. (Hattie places the hatter into three pans and puts them into 
the oven. The two sit down.) 

Mamie M. : Aunt Hattie, I got a new job. 

Hattie F. (surprised) : A new job ? That's jest what I got to 
say about you young niggers, 'fore you have time to turn around in 
one job you get another. What's you doing now, Mamie ? 

Mamie M. : Working down ter the hair dresser's. 

Hattie F. (disgusted) : I might have knowed it (looking at 
Mamies hair) . Here, your hair is straight as Miss Maria's. Don't 
tell me about these niggers with straight hair. If the good Lord had 
intended for it to be straight He would have made it that way. 
Ain't my Teeley's always been straight ? 'Sho thing, when the kinks 
come outer mine it ain't going to be 'cause I done put stuif all over 
it. I'se always taught my Teeley to be a nigger and a good 'un at 
that. 

Mamie M. : Lands, Aunt Hattie, at the dance hall — 

Hattie F. (rising to put a piece of ivood in the stove) : That's 

jest it, you ain't got no business at the dance hall. My Teeley ain't 

never put her foot in there — 

Mamie M. : Hmn ! Nor she ain't. But, Aunt Hattie, you got 

to remember Teeley ain't been here in two years. I didn't go there 

then. Gracious, Aunt Hattie, you dunno what Teeley's doing there 

in New York. 

Hattie F. : Now, don't speck I do, but I knows my Teeley 
wouldn't do nothin' she ought not to. Child, you can't change a 
nigger. 

(A knock at the door.) 

Hattie F. : Come in ! 

(Enter two small white children — a boy of eight and a girl of six.) 
3 



16 The St. Mary's Muse 

Hattie F. : Well, blest my soul, if here ain't Charles and Miss 
Virginia! Mamie, here is them chilluns I been telling you 'bout. 
Come in, chilluns, and sit down. 

Charles : 'No, we can't stay ; guess what we've come for ? 

Virginia : I am going to put something with red leaves on it in 
my basket. 

Charles (to Virginia) : Tattle-tale! What did you have to tell 
for % Hattie, you told us you knew where some flowers were back of 
your house and mother let "Gin" and me come down to get some. 

Virginia: Yes, she said we could go if you would go with us 
to get them. 

Hattie F. (holing out of window) : Ain't that James out there 
in the car ? 

Charles : But we want you to go with us, Hattie. 

Hattie F. : Lands, child, you know I'll take you but I'se jest 
thinking you let him bring you back in 'bout half a hour and then 
we'll go, 'cause I got my cake in the oven now. 

Charles: Oh, goody, Hattie. We will come back. Come on, 
"Gin."' 

(Hattie opens the door and the two children go out.) 

Mamie M. : Ain't they cute ? 

Hattie F. : They shore is sweet chilluns. It is a good thing they 
come for that reminds me of some things Miss Maria give me to sell 
for her. (Hattie goes into the next room and returns with a large 
bundle of clothes.) Mamie, maybe you would like to buy some of 
them. 

(Mamie rises and helps Hattie open the bundle on the lounge.) 

Mamie M. (pulling out an evening dress of jade satin) : If this 
ain't classy, I ain't never seen nothing. 

Hattie F. (looking among the clothes) : Where's the sleeves to 
that thing ? 

Mamie M. (laughing) : Lands, Aunt Hattie, this is all the dress. 

Hattie F. : Course it is, child. I ought to known that, 'cause 
the first night Miss Maria put it on I asked her where was the 
sleeves and I thought she would plumb kill 'erself laughing. 



The St. Mary's Muse 17 



Mamie M. : This is exactly the kind I wanted, with no sleeves 
and no back. 

Hattie F. : You can try it on, Mamie, but Hattie Foster will 
have to be dead 'fore she has on anything like that. These new styles 
ain't meant for niggers like me, and I know my Teeley wouldn't 
wear 'em. 

Mamie M. : This is a pretty serge dress. I'd have to take up the 
skirt, though. 

Hattie F. : That you wouldn't ! It would come to your knees. 
Mamie, here's something you can have {picking up a pair of brocaded 
satin mules). Miss Maria give 'em to me. She called them some 
kind of funny name. Don't tell me 'bout 'em. 

Mamie M. : Jest look at all these shirtwaists ! 

(They spread all the garments out on the lounge.) 

(A voice from outside) : Mrs. Foster ! 

Hattie F. : Come on in, Ada. 

(Enter a negro girl of about eighteen. ) 

Ada : Good evening, Mrs. Foster ; and if here ain't Mamie Mer- 
man. Look at them clothes ! What are they for ? 

Hattie F. : Ada, they is some Miss Maria give me to sell for her. 

Ada (examining the clothes on the lounge) : If this ain't my 
chance to get some clothes ! Mrs. Foster, Bud and I is going to be 
married Sadday night. 

Hattie F. : Child, you talking 'bout getting married. It don't 
seem no time since you were running around here with my Teeley. 

Ada : I am two years older than Teeley. 

Hattie F. : That don't make no difference ; you are too young. 
I know my Teeley ain't thinking 'bout getting married. 

Ada (aside to Mamie): Lawd 'ave mercy! Mrs. Foster don't 
know what Teeley is doing. 

Mamie M. : Dat she don't ! 

Hattie (sniffling) : Somepin' burning ! Have mercy, here I am 
jest setting here and letting my cake burn up 'fore my very eyes. 
Lands a living, Mamie, give me that rag to open the stove door with. 
(Mamie jumps up and hands the rag to Hattie who opens the stove 
door.) (In the meantime, while they are taking the cake from the 



18 The St. Maky's Muse 






stove a young negress, dressed in the most extreme fashion, with 
straight bobbed hair, has entered, followed by a young man.) 

Hattie F. {turns around with a half burnt cake in her hand. At 
the sight of the two, the cake, pan and all drop on the floor) : Teeley! 
Teeley ! (The two fall in each others arms.) 

Teeley : Ma, I thought we would come and give you an Easter 
surprise. Come here, Sam (the young man comes forward). This 
is my husband, Dr. Baxter. 

(Hattie stands amazed, not saying a word for several minutes.) 

Hattie F. : I — er — er — sho is glad to — er — er — see you both. 

Mamie: Aunt jest been talking to us 'bout you all the evening, 
Teeley. 

Hattie F. : Here, Ada, pull up them two chairs. Teeley, you 
and er— er — the doctor, sit down. 

Dr. Baxter : Why, thank you, but I must write some important 
letters. 

Hattie F. : Mamie, you show him in my room. 

(Exit, Dr. Baxter.) 

Teeley: Why, Ma, what is the matter; you look like you are 
sick ? 

Hattie F. : Lawd, child, tain't nothing the matter with me. I 
*speck I do look funny, but I was so surprised when I seed you! 
I ain't sick. 

(Teeley sits down and removes her mannish little hat. Hattie sits 
silent and stares at her hair.) 

Teeley : Ma, doesn't my hair look chic ? 

Hattie F. : Chick what? Maybe that's the style; I dunno. 
A old-time nigger like me can't keep up with them. What's you 
done to it, Teeley? 

Teeley: Well, ma, you know my hair was always long and 
straight so I had it bobbed and the permanent wave put in it. Don't 
you think it looks lots better ? 

Hattie F. : Why er — er — it's all right. Them was pretty 
braids you used to have. 

Teeley : Mamie, how you and Ada getting along ? 



The St. Maky's Muse 19 



Mamie : I am all right. N Ada is going to get married Saturday 
night. 

Teeley: Why, Ada, ain't you married yet? I have been mar- 
ried a year and two months ? 

Hattie F. : Hmn ! 

Teeley : Of course, I have. I didn't see no use in telling you, 
with me in New York and you down here. 

Hattie F. : Yes, child, I 'speck it is a good thing I ain't been 
knowing it all dis time. 

Teeley : Ada, I have a lovely pair of stockings like these I have 
on I will give you. 

Ada: That sho will be nice. 

Mamie : Them is some stockings ! 

Hattie F. : I'se glad you told me 'cause I been looking at you 
wid that dress to your knees and I plumb thought you had on black 
lace. 

Teeley : Ma, these are all lace ones, the lady at the Beauty Shop 
gave me. They cost fifteen dollars a pair ! 

Hattie : They must be going to last a pisinous long time, to cost 
that much. I paid thirty-five cents for these 'fore the war. My 
eyesight ain't good as it used to be, dat's why I didn't see them, I 
'speck. 

Teeley {looking on the floor) : Why, ma, what's that over there 
on the floor ? 

Hattie F. : Honey, your old ma plumb let a cake burn up under 
her nose and then when I seed you it jest dropped out my hand. 
• Teeley : Ma, that don't make no difference, I will make another 
one. I reckon I had better see what Sam is doing first. 

{Exit Teeley.) 

Hattie F. : It 'most knocked me out my senses. 

Ada: I 'clare, Miss Hattie, I'd 'er never known Teeley on this 
earth. 

Mamie : She sure is a high class nigger. 

{Several minutes pass in silence and Teeley reenters in a gingham 
dress and her hair plaited like Hattie' s.) 



20 The St. Mart's Muse 



Hattie F. : I declare, you can say what you want to but you 
can't change a nigger. 

{The door opens and Charles and Virginia appear.) 
Hattie F. : Here is these chilluns for me to go after the flowers 
now. I'll be back in a minute, Teeley. You can decorate like you 
used to when I gets back. I always sed you can't change a nigger ! 

[End — Curtain] 



UQlucKy Uirtue 

Oh, joys forbidd'n, pray tell me how 

I'll e'er resist you all those days? 
Would I were conscienceless as thou, 

Then might I more than on thee gaze! 

Oh, why not ever until now, 

Oh, toothsome tempter wert thou sent? 
A misdirected kindness thou — 

A box of candy during Lent! 

— Louise Egleston. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price --------- Two Dollars 

Single Copies ___-_- Twenty-five Cents 

A magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, 
Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial 
management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1920-1921 

Frances Venable, '21, Chairman 

Kathekine Waddell, '21, 2 A Louise Egleston, '22, E A n 

Editors 

Susan Collier, Business Manager 

Helen Budge, Assistant Business Manager 

EDITORIAL 

Half our school year is over ! The suspense of examinations will 
not overtake us for four more months. And what of it ? We'll, just this : 
We can make the remaining four months just twice as successful as 
those four we have left behind, if we stir to definite action that 
indefinable element we all admire in successful people — "pep." The 
kind that the "Yanks" used in Europe two years ago; the kind that 
is generated at the big league games; the kind that put across the 
great Liberty loans — five of them! That is the "pep" that says 
"We can and we will." And it is the kind that ought to be, and we 
feel sure will be created in every organization of our school life; so 
that everything worth while will realize the sentiment so well ex- 
pressed in a f amaliar and popularly-phrased echo from the "gym." : 

Your pep, your pep, 
You've got it, now keep it; 
Dog-gone you, don't lose it — 

Your "pep." 

The two literary societies have finished their program of prelimi- 
nary debates and the annual debaters have been elected. The pre- 



22 The St. Mary's Muse 

liminaries were held on Tuesday nights every two weeks, alternating 
with the regular meetings of the societies; and keen interest was 
shown in the contest. The Sigma Lambdas had three debates, the 
first, "Resolved, that the country is a better situation for a school 
than the city"; the second, "Resolved, that the deforesting of the 
Pacific Slope should be stopped at once." The first two E. A. P. 
debates were, "Resolved, that English is a more important item of 
education than Mathematics," and, "Resolved, that McSwiney's 
death was a failure to the Irish cause." The third and last debate 
was the same in both societies : "Resolved, that capital punishment 
should be abolished." In the E. A. P.'s, Rebecca Hines and Sophie 
Egleston won the affirmative over the negative, Lenore Powell and 
Evelina Beckwith. And in the Sigma Lambda's, Mary Louise Ev- 
erett and Florida Kent, negative, won from Marietta Gareissen and 
Dorothy Baum, affirmative. The final debaters chosen were Lenore 
Powell and Sophie Egleston, E. A. P., and Mary Louise Everett, 
and Marietta Gareissen, Sigma Lambda. The annual debate (on 
prohibition of immigration) comes off early in March, though as 
yet the date has not been definitely fixed. The E. A. P.'s have 
the affirmative and the Sigma Lambda's the negative, and the contest 
bids fair to be a sharply drawn one, for all parties are hard at work. 

The Lenten Mission Study classes have been formed and leaders 
chosen for them from the Blue Ridge delegation of last year. Lenore 
Powell and Addie Huske are conducting one on a very interesting 
subject, the text book used being one entitled, "Making Life Count." 
Florida Kent and Frances Venable are conducting another on the 
study of the "Near East." The meetings are to be held every Friday 
night throughout Lent and we expect good results as the large enroll- 
ment is very promising. 



The St. Mary's Muse 23 



DRAMATIC CLUB 

The Dramatic Club, under the directorship of Miss Florence 
Davis, is forging- ahead in preparation for its first play. This play 
will be presented just before the beginning of Commencement and 
gives promise of being one of the most successful ones Miss Davis 
has ever put on. 

At its last regular meeting the club was organized. 

In addition to the President and Secretary, a Business Manager 
was elected. This business manager is to have part charge of set- 
ting the stage and is to be responsible for the lighter stage properties. 
In other words, Miss Davis has now a special stage assistant, and she 
can give more time and attention to the actual directing of the plays. 



LITERARY SOCIETIES 

The E. A. P. and Sigma Lambda Literary societies are carrying 
on this year practically the same inter-society contest which was 
planned and used last term. The form of contest this time, however, 
omits the "Model Inter-society Meetings." The two model meet- 
ings, fall and spring, the inter-society debate, and the monthly Muse 
contests are the same. 

There has been some discussion as to whether or not the society 
winning for the year should be presented with a fitting trophy. ~No 
definite action has been taken upon this so far, but the societies intend 
to reach a decision after the holidays. 

Contrary to the custom of previous years, the new girls were not 
allowed to select the society to which they desired to belong, but were 
chosen by committees from each society. This was done so that both 
societies would have an equal membership, and an even chance in the 
contest. 

There was much doubt as to how this new method would work. 
It seems to have been successful, and excellent spirit is being shown 
by all concerned. 



24 The St. Mary's Muse 



THE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

The two athletic associations have begun the season with much 
"pep" and activity, both ambitious to hang another banner on the 
wall in the "gym." The first thing on the schedule is basketball. 
This year each association has three teams, the first teams to play 
three out of five games for the team championship, and the other 
two, two out of three. 

Close on to basketball comes volley-ball. Two teams are to be 
selected, each team playing the best two out of three games for the 
championships. The tennis tournament takes a different form this 
time, each association being represented by eight players. Thus 
the tournament is narrowed down to sixteen players, and Sigmas and 
Mus are matched together in the process of elimination for champion 
of the school. Each winning player gains a certain number of points 
for her side. 

Later on in the spring the meet will be held and the two associa- 
tions will be matched in various games and races. 



The St. Mary's Muse 25 



SCHOOL NEWS 



Christmas News 



The Play 

The long-looked-forward-to Senior play, given annually at Christ- 
mas as a treat to the school, was especially enjoyable this year as it 
was the production of a talented young member of the Senior class, 
Katherine Waddell. It was on the night of December 18th and 
double excitement and expectation was created among the enthusiastic 
crowd in the auditorium when the programs with their Christmas 
decoration of holly and the interesting "cast of characters" were 
passed around. Then at last the curtain rose and "The Christmas 
Doll," as published in the Christmas Muse, was artistically and capa- 
bly given. It was the consensus of opinion that "everybody looked bet- 
ter than they ever had" (if that were possible among the Seniors). 
The costumes of the Christmas Bells and Brownies were realistic and 
charming, and each and every member of the cast entered with 
enthusiasm into "his" or her part. Suzanne Pegues and Dorothy 
Kirtland were a decided novelty and their "snowballing" was so 
enthusiastically encored that it made one fairly shiver. Fielding 
Douthat as Santa Claus was quite a success and did "his" duty well 
by every little boy and girl, especially our Little Girl, Eleanor H. 
Cobb. The thing nearest her heart seemed to be Elizabeth Nolan, 
the Christmas Doll, and one of the prettiest we have ever seen from 
all Santa's pack. Florida Kent and Virginia Jordan, as the Christ- 
mas Turkey, and the White Rabbit, respectively, gave the right note 
of humor to the play with their perfect costumes and dramatic inter- 
pretation of these characters. "Tinkle" and "High Jinks" helped 
Santa Claus nobly in recovering the lost doll and went to sleep so 
naturally and peacefully in the woods that nobody had the heart to 
blame them for resting from their search to "wait for the moon." 
Mabel Merritt as "Night" appeared in the forest scene and gave in 
her fleeting passage across the stage a touch of the weird and super- 
natural. The songs were snappy and well given throughout and at 



26 The St. Mary's Muse 



the sound of "Home, Sweet Home" and "God Eest You, Merry 
Gentlemen," in the last scene, the audience was sorely tempted to join 
the players in the singing of the holiday tunes. 

Miss Ebie and Margaret Elliott provided the music and popular 
airs between scenes, and the irrepressible Christmas spirit alive in 
all hearts added whatever was necessary, if anything could be, to the 
general decision that it was "purely excellent." 

"The Night Before Christmas" 

Sunday evening, December 19th, will be long remembered not only 
because it was the "night before" we went home for Christmas, but 
also for the succession of happy events which took place. To begin 
with, there were the traditional oysters at supper. And such a sup- 
per as it was! Salad and sandwiches, punch and cake and real 
ambrosia, besides the aforementioned oysters and salted peanuts. 
Then there were the pretty little Christmas trees which were set aglow 
with little red candles at a signal from the Eector's table. The paper 
doilies with Christmas decorations served admirably for memory book 
fillers. Three cheers for Mrs. Marriott were given with a will and 
these were followed by various toasts to faculty and officers. Mr. 
Way, in an appropriate word, bade the school adieu and wished all 
the happy girls a "merry, merry Christmas." 

The Muse Club, having nothing weightier on hand for its consider- 
ation than the coming gaieties, entered into the discussion of these 
with a will and had one of the most enjoyable meetings of the year. 
The Muse room was appropriately decorated in holly and mistletoe 
and the feeling that "something was going to happen" was unmis- 
takably in the air. And something did happen ! Mrs. Perkins and 
Miss Katie, Miss Lee, and Miss Bottum, all came to join them. The 
chairman, Frances Venable, on behalf of the Muse Club, paid a 
tribute of appreciation to Mr. Cruikshank, through whose instru- 
mentality everything it undertakes is made possible. Following her, 
Susan Collier added a few appropriate words emphasizing our debt 
of gratitude, which tributes Mr. Cruikshank graciously acknowledged. 
Then followed an impromptu program, which proved very enjoyable. 



The St. Mary's Muse 27 



Fielding Douthat gave some of the numbers which she had so suc- 
cessfully used in the Christmas recital, winning as great applause 
again. Then Miss Katie and Mrs. Perkins added to this interesting 
accounts of two Christmases they had seen ; Miss Katie telling about 
the celebration in Southern homes before the war, when "The Quar- 
ters" were a big item in the life of the South and every black friend 
on the big plantations was remembered by the good people in the 
"great house." Mrs. Perkins told of a wonderful Christmas tree 
she had witnessed on the North Carolina State Farm and gave a 
touching and interesting account of the emotions of the recipients 
of the treat and their benefactors. Then came the surprise when 
Susan Collier appeared again in the side door, bringing candies of 
every sort for the girls and their guests. 

Mr. and Mrs. Way entertained at a floating reception all the even- 
ing and many were the boxes of popcorn which Warren and Eoger 
popped for the girls and which they consumed while sitting Japanese 
fashion on the floor 'round a "real open fire" and talking about 
a little of everything, but mostly "home." The nine o'clock bell put 
an end to the festivities, but even after the last caller had said good- 
night, the thoughtful young hosts put a quantity of their snowy pop- 
corn on the porch for the Seniors, who at five o'clock the next morning 
would come circling the buildings with glowing candles in their hands 
and on their lips the strains of "O, Little Town of Bethlehem." 



Preps Entertair) 

At the suggestion and with the help of their class adviser, Miss 
Stone, the "Preps" gave a delightful little entertainment in the par- 
lor on Thursday evening, December 16th. The school gathered there 
instead of in the study hall for assembly and sang Christmas carols. 
Mr. Way led in prayer, after which Mabel Hawkins, President of 
the "Preps," explained the object of the meeting and asked that their 
class might be given the last Thursday night before the Christmas 
holidays every year. Bishop Cheshire was the speaker of the even- 
ing and told very interestingly of his travels abroad. Josephine 



28 The St. Mary's Muse 



Gould and Virginia Herbert Wilson gave a duet, "It Came Upon the 
Midnight Clear"; and the program was closed with the singing of 
Christmas carols by the audience. 



Tl)e Christmas Recital 

The pupils of Miss Florence Davis entertained charmingly Thurs- 
day afternoon, December 16th, with a short expression recital and 
a one-act play, "The Teeth of the Gift Horse," by Margaret Cameron. 

The members were alive with Christmas spirit and enthusiasm, 
and called forth many thrills and awed exclamations. Fielding 
Douthat's numbers, as usual, were greatly enjoyed. She gave four 
selections which seemed particularly suited to her talent. Edgar 
Guest's "On Going Home for Christmas" was perhaps the most 
touching in its appeal. Virginia Herbert Wilson deserves to be 
commended on her "Jes Fore Christmas," the universal verdict upon 
which was "darling." These are only two of the five whose recita- 
tions reflected great credit on their teacher. 

"The Teeth of the Gift Horse" was a humorous little piece. The 
players made the most of every opportunity to provoke laughs, and 
it may truly be said that it "got across." Daisy Cooper's interpre- 
tation of Katie, the maid, and Marjorie Wilkins' of the old maid 
aunt, were both clever bits of work. 
Following is the afternoon's program: 

Paet I 

1. The Christmas Substitute Anna g< Packard 

Marjorie Wilkins 

2. (a) Getting Ready for Christmas Edgar Guest 

(6) Crowded Out. 

(c) A Child's Christmas Song T A Daly 

id) On Going Home for Christmas Edgar Guest 

Fielding Douthat 

3. The Shepherds and the Angels From « Ben Hur> , 

Elizabeth Anthony 

4. Jes Fore Christmas E Fiel( j 

Virginia H. Wilson 

5. The Shepherd Boy's Carol. 

Edith Barton 



The St. Mary's Muse 29 



Part II 
"THE TEETH OF THE GIFT HORSE" 

One-act Play by Margaret Cameron 



Characters 

Richard Butler Elizabeth Anthony 

Florence Butler, his wife Dorothy Cobbs 

Marietta Williams, his aunt Marjorie Wilkins 

Anne Fisher ) f Elizabeth Ballou 

Delvin Blake } Friends of the ButlerS 1 Margaret Brown 



Time — Christmas Eve 
Scene — Living-room of the Butler's home 



L. P. 



Peace — St. Mary's Concert 

The second concert of the Peace-St, Mary's series was held in the 
auditorium Monday evening, January 10th, with Miss Ellen Eumsey 
as soloist, accompanied by our own Miss Southwick. 

Miss Eumsey quickly won the approval of her audience by her 
charming manner and lovely contralto voice, the solos being made 
more enjoyable by the skillful accompaniment of Miss Southwick. 
Her program contained solos in French and Italian, and in her attrac- 
tive manner she explained the story of each one. 

But her audience waxed most enthusiastic over "Specially Jim" 

and "Let Me Dream Again." This was the most successful concert 

given here this year, as shown by the rather alarming number of notes 

of appreciation written to her by the girls. 

E. G. B. 



First and Third Tearo Games 

Mus and Signias alike were glowing with excitement and self- 
confidence on that critical night of January 15th, when first and third 
teams met in hard-fought battle. The "gym." was a veritable bedlam 
of cheers and songs and "pep" ran high. 



30 



The St. Mary's Muse 



The third teams were the first to take the floor. The first half 
was screamingly successful for the Sigmas, but during the second 
half the Mus became awakened to the necessity for quick and violent 
action, and what a fight it was ! The final score was 14-13, in favor 
of the Sigmas. The first team game was, of course, the most thrill- 
ing of all. From the beginning the Mus seemed to gain the upper 
hand, and theirs was a glorious victory, the score being 35-15. The 
line-ups were as follows: 

First Teams 

Mu - 

Sigma 

B - Br0Wn I „ (M. Dixon 

M.L. Langley j Forwards j M . Blakely 



F. Kent 
H. Barber 

F. Venable 

J. W. Ashworth 



Mu 

M. McCoy 
Richards 

M. Gresham 
J. Gould 

E. Nolan 
M. Gilchrist 



. Centers . 



1m. 



Ballou-M. Powell 
Hawkins 



.Guards, 



r 



M. L. Everett 
Baum 



Third Teams 



.Forwards. 



. Centers . 



Sigma 

S. Collier 
M. Thompson 

S. Phillips 
L. Hairston 



.Guards. 



{'■ 



Nixon 

M. Roberson 

L. P. 



The Great Sqow War 

Tuesday, January 23d, brought the first big snow of the season, 
and on Wednesday morning after a conference between Generals 
Baum and Villepigue, an assembly was called and a declaration of 
war between the Mus and Sigmas made public. Great was the 
excitement which followed, and vast preparations were made for the 
campaign— big forts being built and quantities of rather soft ammuni- 
tion being made. The fight was swift and steady, much skill in direct 



The St. Mary's Muse 31 



aim being displayed on both sides. But when a lull in the opera- 
tions was called by Marshall Hesse and the half frozen, snow-ladened 
girls trooped in again, no one could tell which side had been the 
victor. 



E. G. B. 



The Fashior) Show 

Who among us does not feel a thrill when seeing lovely clothes ? 
So popular was the idea of "A Fashion Show, given by St. Agnes' 
chapter this afternoon at 1:30," that the little maids, becomingly 
attired in black dresses and fluffy white aprons, had a difficult time 
of seating their patrons. So, seated Turkish fashion, we felt that 
we were a part of the party in the charming little playlet enacted on 
the stage placed at one end of the parlor. 

It seems that Emily Burgwyn, in the role of a young country girl, 
had just been left a fortune and, aided by her mother, was selecting 
a trousseau at the Maison de Madame Kirtland. Much mirth was 
enjoyed at the expense of Madame and visitors but a gasp of pure 
joy and admiration escaped from the audience as the bride, Julia 
Winston Ashworth, came sedately down the steps. 

Conspicuous among the models were : Alice Brunson, as the athletic 

girl; Josephine Eose and Sarah Hester in evening dress, which 

brought up memories of Christmas joys; Mary Wiatt Yarborough 

and Eugenia Trexler in organdies, reminding us of the joys of St. 

Mary's in spring-time, and Florence Cline in the ever popular "Alice 

Blue" gown. 

E. G. B. 

On the dreary and snowy afternoon of January 27th the Seniors 
and some of the faculty assembled in the cheery and warm living- 
room of the rectory, where Mr. and Mrs. Way entertained them 
most delightfully and informally. Cards were passed around bearing 
the words "Class of Twenty-one," from which the guests were asked 
to form as many words as possible in five minutes. Mrs. Way gra- 
ciously promised not to tell the way some of the Seniors spelled some 



32 The St. Mary's Muse 



of the words. However, or somehow, Dorothy Kirtland managed to 
find seventy-one words and was awarded a dainty white handkerchief 
for the highest score. Delicious refreshments of ice cream, cakes, 
and bon bons were served, after which the guests played many other 
games. Singing was indeed one feature of the afternoon. The girls, 
grouping themselves around the bright open fire, sang many of the 
old St. Mary's songs and class songs. It was with regret that they bade 
their host and hostess goodbye. However, the Seniors appreciated 
Mr. and Mrs. Way's hearty invitation to come often to the rectory 
and look forward to accepting their hospitality. 

D. K. 



Sophomores to trje Seniors 

Senior Hall was all excitement on Saturday afternoon, January 
29th, for it was the day of the long-looked-forward-to Sophomore 
Party. And to add to the anticipation we already felt came the 
request for us to wear our prettiest evening dresses. At the appointed 
time, eight o'clock, fifteen Sophomores, attired in white skirts, dark 
coats, and with their hair drawn back tightly and sporting realistic 
mustaches, escorted the fifteen Seniors to the Muse Eoom. There 
we were met at the door by Dorothy Baum, Sophomore President, in 
a beautiful evening dress of purple and lavendar, the Senior colors. 
Coming into the Muse Eoom, we could scarcely believe it was our 
familiar meeting place. Such a transformation! We had stepped 
into a real cabaret : a cabaret and all that goes with it. Artistically 
arranged tables, pretty waitresses and an orchestra, which played the 
latest jazz songs. The Senior colors were effectively carried out in 
the decorations, lavendar and purple streamers being hung from the 
ceiling; and this color scheme was used in the dainty refreshments 
and attractive place cards. During the evening an entertaining 
cabaret program was rendered. We could not decide which was the 
best, for Louise Buice's "Vampire," Mary Gilchrist's "Jazz Baby" 
and the "Bobbed-haired Chorus," Elizabeth Grantham, Van Wilkins, 
and Lucille Dempsey; Bessie Brown's Song, "Mother o'Mine," 
accompanied by Margaret Elliott's violin, and Emily Hart at the 



The St. Mary's Muse 33 

piano, were all so good. The chic little girls, J. Kose, in a ballet 
dress of black with orange flowers, and Mary Louise Everett in a 
white ballet dress, with numerous little powder puffs, passed in 
between the tables carrying pretty baskets filled with mints. It was 
all so real, so thrilling, that we had to keep pinching ourselves to 
realize that it was school and that we were not dreaming. All good 
things have to come to an end, however, and all too soon it was time 
for the Seniors to bid their hostesses goodnight and to go talk over 
the cutest, most enjoyable party we had ever seen. 

E. N. 



Freshroan-Junior Party 

On Saturday night, February 26th, the parlor was a veritable fairy 
land of red hearts and lights that shone with a ruddy glow. It was- 
the scene of the annual party to the Juniors, given by the Freshmen. 
The party burst into being with a colorful, resplendent grand march, 
led by Margaret Huske and Martha Best, at the end of which every 
one was the proud possessor of a festive paper cap. 

There were many forms of entertainment provided by the resource- 
ful Freshmen. An attractive contest was held, the blanks in the 
interesting little St. Mary's sketch being filled in with the names of 
songs, which were played by Helen Powell. The prize was won by 
Evelina Beckwith. The Juniors were then favored with a special 
treat, the shooting of their fortunes with bow and arrow. Martha 
Best and Marietta Gareissen were the winners of the contest dance. 
Much enjoyment was derived from every one's efforts, some fruitful, 
and some hopelessly otherwise, to pin a heart to a man's picture, in 
just exactly the right spot. Virginia Thigpen was the lucky, or 
shall we say, the most skillful one, and her reward was a bag of kisses. 

The delightful affair was wound up, very acceptably, and very 
charmingly, by a delicious salad course. When the strains of "Home, 
Sweet Home" bade every one, tactfully enough, to say goodbye to her 
gracious hostesses, it was the popular opinion that this must surely 
have been the best party that a Freshman class ever gave to the 
Juniors. L " P ' 



34 The St. Mary's Muse 



Stunt Night 

Stunt night, February 7, 1921, marked a new event in the history 
of the school. Miss Stone's suggestion of a night when all the school 
should exert itself for charity was successfully carried out. 

Every one of an expectant audience watched with increasing 
delight the attractive valentine play, "Lost Hearts," which was 
effectively rendered by the Junior and Freshman classes. 

One felt once more that one was in the "Land of Love" as Dan 
Cupid and the Queen of Hearts planned their sly, entangling nets to 
entice innocent young men and girls into the Ship of Matrimony. 

The trial of Mary Louise Everett by the faculty for breaking the 
door on third floor brought appreciative shrieks of laughter from the 
audience, especially when Miss St. John (Elizabeth Tucker) "glided" 
across the court-room weeping bitter tears for the victim, and when 
Miss Shearer (Dorothy Nixon) assented with her "Me non" to every 
word that Judge Perkins spoke. This, given by the Sophomore class, 
had the honor of receiving the highest vote at the polls. 

Patented funny paper stunts, by the Senior Class, bade fair to 
out-do Bud Fisher's "Mutt and Jeff." The plot was extremely hair- 
raising, when Mrs. Newlywed (Elizabeth Nolan), charmed by Happy 
Hooligan's good looks, missed her precious, curly-headed Snookums 
(Virginia Jordan), but the valiant Detective Hawkshaw (Florida 
Kent) found the baby and won his world-wide reputation. 

A broad grin passed over the faces of the audience as the Hawkins 
Negro Minstrel took its place on the stage. The end men, Messrs. 
Cabell, Richards, Andrews, Walker, Cheatham, and Ambler, never 
for an instant allowed the audience to settle down. The climax was 
reached when Richards, in the new fashion of a "coon figger," jigged 
time and time again before the excited spectators. 

The Muse Club gave a reminiscent sketch of the past history of 
the St. Mary's, as the girls of long ago came and passed through flits 
of fancy. But the girl of '21, with her short skirt and stylish cha- 
peau, made the dream come true. 

The Sketch Club proved to the boosters of the evening that St. 
Mary's had many remarkable cartoonists that were budding into 
prominence. 



The St. Mary's Muse 35 



The Dramatic Club presented a charming pantomime. The strains 
of lovely music filled the air as the curtain rose on a toy shop, filled 
with many, many dolls. Customers came and went, always admiring 
the beautiful dolls and smiling at the eagerness of the old shop- 
keeper. Anne Kirtland, the dainty French doll, made many a little 
girl's heart throb. The two fat rag dolls (Dorothy Kirtland and 
Daisy Cooper) danced very gracefully, considering that they were 
mere rag dolls. 

A patriotic air was heard from the piano and brought the pathetic 
| scene of a Red Cross nurse and two ragged little children. Every 
one's heart was touched and a hush came over the auditorium. 

After the stunts were over the crowds rushed to the polls where 

they cast their votes for the best stunt. St. Mary's girls rallied to the 

Red Cross call and the answer was $148. 

M. w. 



The Colonial Ball 

On February 8th, the last evening before Lent, the parlor was the 
scene of a picturesque and popular entertainment, the annual Colonial 
ball. At eight-fifteen Miss Sutton began the familiar strains of the 
old favorite, "Clayton's Grand March." The march was led by 
Miss Dorothy Kirtland and her escort, "Mr." Frances Venable. 
The old-fashioned costumes, which characterized the entertainment, 
were exquisite and varied. Lovely Colonial tableaux were presented, 
accompanied by appropriate solos by Misses Bessie Brown and Eve- 
lina Beckwith. The tableaux were ended by a charming dance and 
songs by Misses Mildred Waddell and Anne Kirtland. Following 
these quaint old-fashioned pictures, Misses Mary Louise Everett, 
Caroline Moore, Mabel Hawkins, Virginia Wilson, Fielding Douthat, 
Elizabeth Carrigan, Sarah Jessup, and Martha Best, entertained the 
other guests with the charming but intricate figures of a stately 
minuet. Modern dances gave place for the evening to the "Virginia 
Reel." Delicious punch and cakes were served and both faculty and 
students departed, declaring that they had enjoyed to the utmost the 
prettiest Colonial Ball in years. J - A - M - 



The Carrjpaigr) for the St. Mary's fund 

After some months of comparative inactivity the work for the 
completion of the St. Mary's Fund has this year taken on renewed 
activity and it is hoped that the coming year will bring big results 
for it. 

In January, 1920, the Kev. Francis M. Osborne, who since the 
beginning of the campaign had been in active charge of the work, as 
special representative of the trustees, accepted the chair of Theology | 
in the Theological School at the University of the South, Sewanee. 
However, at the request of the special committee of the trustees in 
charge of the St. Mary's Fund, he continued to devote such time as 
he could to the affairs of the fund until other arrangements could 
be made. 

On September 1st Mr. Osborne's connection with the campaign 
ceased and the work has been divided for continuation along geo 
graphical lines, the whole continuing under the direction of the 
special committee, the Rev. Isaac W. Hughes, of Henderson, Chair- 
man; Mr. Graham H. Andrews, of Raleigh, Treasurer, and Mr. 
George C. Royall, of Goldsboro. 

$200,000 was the quota originally assigned to the Carolinas and 
of this sum $185,000 was fully or tentatively pledged under the 
leadership of Mr. Osborne ; $100,000 is the aim of the campaign out- 
side of the Carolinas and the work for this is just beginning. 

The three divisions of the work now are, therefore: 

(1) The National Campaign, with headquarters in New York City, 
and working in all the territory outside of the Carolinas. The head- 
quarters are at 116 West 39th Street, where Mr. George O. Tamblyn 
is executive secretary, and Mr. John Crosby Brown is publicity 
director. Mrs. William G. McAdoo ("Eleanor Wilson, 1906-08) 
has accepted the National Chairmanship. 

(2) The work in the State of North Carolina has been put in 
charge of the Rev. A. C. D. Noe, of Farmville, and the Rev. C. H. 



The St. Mary's Muse 37 



Bascom, of Greenville, who have been very successful in the work of 
the Sewanee Campaign. Gifts of $5,000 from Mr. Erwin A. Holt, 
of Burlington, and $1,000 from Mrs. Annie Gray Nash Sprunt, of 
Wilmington, in November, have given impetus to their work. 

(8) The work in the State of South Carolina is in charge of the 
diocesan authorities, who have included $30,000 of their share of the 
St. Mary's Fund in their budget in the Nation-wide Campaign. They 
t have recently made a payment of $5,000 on account. 

The first of this year the collection of the pledges was transferred 
to the school and it is now being conducted from the school office. 



Progress of the Natiorjal Campaigr) 

The work of organization for the campaign outside of the Caro- 

linas is, of course, one requiring both time and energy. Except for 

; the group of alumnse in New York City and Norfolk, the alumnae 

! outside of the Carolinas are scattered and unorganized. After the 

! perfection of the national organization comes the organization by 

' districts and by groups. Miss Lucille Murchison, formerly of Wil- 

' mington, is chairman of the Metropolitan District, and Mrs. Ery 

Kehays (formerly Grace Whitaker, of Winston-Salem) is chairman 

for New York City. Mrs. William C. Kivers (Mary Battle) is 

chairman of the Washington District. 

It is the purpose to have a preliminary luncheon or dinner in each 

district in getting the campaign started, and these meetings have 

already been successfully held in New York, Baltimore, Washing- 

; ton and Norfolk. The rector was present and spoke at each of these 

: meetings. 

Messrs. Tamblyn and Brown have prepared some very attractive 
advertising to promote the campaign, including an illustrated book- 
let, "In the Grove," and a series of illustrated leaflets introducing 
and calling attention to the campaign method, which is tied up with 
the numerals 2-6-0. After the interest has been aroused in these 
figures, it is explained that they represent the sum of $1.00 a week 
for five years, or $260, which each alumna outside of the Carolinas 
is asked to accept as her quota to get or give — preferably get. In 



38 The St. Mary's Muse 



other words, instead of a canvass of individuals, each alumna is to 
constitute herself a committee of one and undertake to see that the 
school through her efforts receives $260 for the fund in the five 
years. A similar method has been used in other campaigns with 
much success. 

The managers of the campaign are especially desirous that the 
alumna? should not misunderstand the "2-6-0." It is not a request 
to "give" but to "get or give," preferably the former, as the getting 
involves arousing the interest of additional friends. 



Tfoe Faculty Recitals 

It was suggested to a number of Alumnae Chapters in the fall that 
it would be possible to arrange for concerts in their towns under their 
auspices during the winter session, if they desired to cooperate. Miss 
Southwick, who has earned a high reputation as a brilliant pianist 
in the two years she has been at St. Mary's, since graduating with 
honors from the New England Conservatory ; Miss SpofTord, mezzo- 
soprano ; and Miss Davis, reader, were available for these recitals. 

As a result of the activity of Miss Shields in this matter, these 
ladies gave a series of concerts with much success in the weeks pre- 
ceding Lent. 

Miss Southwick and Miss SpofTord appeared in Edenton, where 
the chapter, under the leadership of Miss Marian Drane, president, 
and Miss Camilla McMillan, secretary, gave the concert for the 
benefit of the High School Library; at Greenville, where Miss 
lSTovella Moye, president of the chapter, and also director of the Girl 
Scouts, interested the scouts in the matter, and at Scotland Neck, 
where Miss Shields had charge of the arrangements. 

Miss Southwick and Miss Davis gave a concert in Henderson under 
the auspices of the chapter, at the home of Mrs. F. L. Toepleman 
(Elizabeth Corbitt). 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Patronize those who patronize you. Remember that it is 
the advertisers who make the publication of the Musk 
possible. 

DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 

206-10 MASONIC TEMPLE 



SILVER DRUG STORE 



The Rexall Store 



Huyler's 
Candies 



The Place To Meet Your Friends 



Waterman 
Fountain Pens 



Little puffs of powder, 

Little dabs of paint — 
Make my little lady 

Look like what she ain't. 
But little cakes of Ivory soap 

And little drops of water — 
Make this same young lady look 

Just like what she oughter. 



YOUR KIND OF SHOES 
At 

FHOMPSONSHOECO. 

17 East Martin Street 



'You get them when promised" 



Hcrr/oh s Studio 

Masonic Temple 



"Workers in Artistic Photography" 



Advertisements 



St. Mary's Girls Always Welcome at 

Hudson-Belk Company 

Full line of Ready-to-wear, Hosiery, Gloves, Furnishings, Dry 
Goods, Shoes, Toilet Goods, Ribbons and Laces 



Stationebt 

Sporting Goods 

Kodak Supplies 

"Waterman Ideal Fountain Pens 



JAMES E. THIEM 



Bell Phone 135 



Raleigh, N. C. 



ROYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 

Made Fresh Every Day 



WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 



Walk-Over Shoe Shop 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



SIDDELL'S STUDIO 

High-class Portrait and Kodak Finishing 
126 1-2 Fayetteville Street 



Joyful Sophomore: "Congratulate me, I've passed the first half of my 
history!" 

Senior Collier: "That's fine, and how many more halves will you have 
to take " 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



MARRIAGE INVITATIONS AND 
VISITING CARDS 

CORRECTLY and PROMPTLY ENGRAVED 

Send for samples and prices 

Edwards & Broughton Printing 
Company 

Steel Die and Copper Plate Engraven 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements 



I F I R D ' S 

208 FAYETTEVILLE ST. 

i ■ 

Order by Mail . Phone 208 



E F I R D ' S 
DEPARTMENT 
STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Full lines of Ready-to Wear, Silks, Shoes, Piece Goods, 
Toilet Articles, Gloves, Etc, 



Mcdonald 

I THOMAS 

The Paint 
Store 

RALEIGH 



Paints 

Enamels 

Stains 

Fly Screens 

Hardwood Floors 

Weather Strips 



MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
MILLINERY 



SHU-FIXERY 



Phone 503 

103 Fayetteville Street 

Raleigh, n. c. 



WYATT'S QUALITY SEEDS 

And Farm Machinery 

For North Carolina farms and gardens 
SEND FOR 1919 PRICE LIST 

JOB P, WYATT & SONS CO. 

RALEIGH, N. G. 



F. PESCUD 

W. Hargett Street 



Books and 
Stationery 



C. D. ARTHUR City Market 

FISH AND OYSTERS 



She had dresses and hats by the dozens, 

She had coats, she had furs without end; 
She had boots, she had tweedies and slippers — 

'Twas a marvel how much she could spend; 
She bought autos and houses and jewels, 

And she showed me no mercy at all. 
You would think that she'd surely have broke me, 

But — she was my paper doll! 



See Us For 

PORCH FURNITURE 

■foyall & Borden Furniture 
: Company : : 

Fayetteville Street 



Carolina Power 
& Light Company 



Electric Light, Power and Gas 



1376 - BOTH PHONES - 1377 



Advertisments 



Brotans 

FIFTH AVENUE SHOPS 



Authentic Apparel for the College Miss 

108 Fayetteville St. 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



ESTBD.I8S8 *J 

){-l^IHERls50NS 

( JEWELERS 
.^RALEIGrLN.G. 

*•♦.. d& y 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STOKE 

Phones 228 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



COMPANY flATE 
\ectjre 
APITAL Ouccessful 



CHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

R. S. BTJSBEE, Secretary and Treasurer 



HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STORE 

Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 



'Twas sad about poor Mary, 
She died a tragic death. 

The doctors all agreed it was 
A shortage of her breath. 




THE 
GIRL'S 
STORE 



Ready-to-Wear 
Stationery and 
Everything for 
You - - - 



THE 
GIRL'S 
STORE 



THE YARBOROUGH 



Raleigh's Leading and 
Largest Hotel. Dinners 
and Banquets a Spe- 
cialty. ... 



B. H. GRIFFIN HOTEL CO., 

Proprietors 



Advertisements 



^homas H. Briggs & Sons 

he Big Hardware Men Raleigh, N. C. 



Base Balls, Basket Balls 
Tennis and Sporting Goods 



MISS SAIDIE M. KING 

Exclusive Ready-to-Wear 

33 Fayetteville Street Phone 1152 

Second floor Dobbin-Ferrall's 



ILIFORNIA FRUIT STORE Candies, Ice Cream, Fruit 
e carry the most complete line of Fruit and 
Candies in town. 

Ill FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



JOHNSON COAL & ICE CO. 



9 West Martin Street 



Phone 457 



Caviness' Grocery 

Everything Good to Eat 

HILLSBORO STREET 



THE FASHION Kaplan Bros. Co. 

The college girls' store for Snappy, Classy, 
Youthful Garments and Millinery. 

TEN PER CENT DISCOUNT TO COLLEGE 
STUDENTS AND TEACHERS 

KOONCE FURNITURE STORE 

111 East Hargett St. 

CHEAPEST PLACE 



Her foot, it was a wee one, 
And her ankle, it was slim. 

But gee! he thought it was a ton- 
When it came to "kicking" him. 



ULLON SUPPLY GO. 

ALL KINDS OF 
MACHINERY 

Where Quality Reigns Supreme 
RALEIGH. N. C. 



Insure Against Loss by Fire 

at Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

Charles E. Johnson, Jr. 

Office: Raleigh Bank & Trust Co. Bldg. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



fTATSON PICTURE AND ART CO. 

icture Frames and Window Shades. 



RIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance 




FROM INFANCY TO MATURITY 

Raleigh, N. C. 
209 Fayetteville St. Phone 2250 

L. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kind?; 

Auto Tire Repair Co. f^-springfieid 

108 WEST DAVIE STREET 

WALKER ELECTRIC SHOP 
WEST MARTIN STREET 



Advertisements 



T. R. WORKMAN 

Wall Paper and 
Interior Decorating 

SOUTH WILMINGTON STREET 



ORDER YOUR CUT FLOWERS 

FBOM 

J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Phone 149 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
College Pennants, Pillows, Pictures, 
Frames, Novelties. 



The Best in 
Groceries 



B.W.JONES 

THOMPSON ELECTRIC COMPANY 

132 Fayetteville Street RALEIGH, N. C. 

Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 



White's 



Ice 
Cream 



Made 



Staudt's Bakery 



" My Mother's Bread " 
Once Tried Never Denied 



YOUNG & HUGHES 



Plumbers 

Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 



S. Wilmington Strei 



H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquet 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plani 

RALEIGH, N. C. Phone 113 

Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSF& 

T. B. GILL, Manager at Station 

Phone 529 



W. L. BROGDEN & CO 

W HOLES AL 
Wilmington Street 



WHOLESALE FRUITS 

Raleigh, N. ( 



BATES-ARRINGTON & COMPANY 
PURE FOOD GROCERIES 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 



H. R. Hale & Bro. L ^: r r SHOE i 

17 EAST MARTIN STREET 



MISSES BADGER & DENTON 

MILLINERY 

Over T. W. Dobbin Co., 123 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N.( 
"The Store of Originations" 



ELLIS 1 

Raleigh's Newest Ready-to-Wear Store 

126 Fayetteville Street 



WILLIAM HELLER 

BOOTERY SHOP 



Patronize Our Advertisers 
They Patronize Us 



Location 

Central for the Carolinas 



Climate 
Healthy and delightful 



St. Marts School 

RALEIGH, N. C 

(Foe Girls and Young Women) 

[GHTIETH ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPT. 15, 1921 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. EASTER TERM BEGAN 
JANUARY 4, 1921 



1. THE COLLEGE 

2. THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
St. Mary's \ g THE ART DEPARTMENT 

4. THE ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT 

5. THE HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 

6. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL 

7. THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



offers 
instruction 

in these 
Departments 



In 1920-21 are Enrolled 275 Students from 16 Dioceses 
Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 
slight to the Scholastic training. 
For catalogue and other information address 



Rev. Warren W. Way, Rector. 



EDWARDS t, BROUQHTOH PRINTING CO., RALEIGH. N. C. 



, 



Wot 
9t Jfflarp'a Jfflusfc 

fcaletgij, Ji C. 



Spring dumber 

april, 192 1 



The St. Mary's Muse 

SPRING NUMBER 



^ol. XX VI April, 1921 Xo. 5 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 

Edited by the Sigma Lambda Literary Society 
Katherine Waddeel, '21, Editor-in-Chief 
Florida Kent, '21, Assistant Editor 



To a Violet 

Katherine Waddell, '21 

When all the plants of earth were made 
A flower was planted in the shade, 
Unseen to bloom, unseen to fade, 
All hidden in some leafy glade — 
A violet. 

tiny flower, all wet with dew, 

1 gaze into the heart of you; 
And in its golden depths I view 

A loving heart that's beating true — 
And tender. 

And modest flower, I would that we, 
As loving and as true might be. 
And faithful to eternity, 
Our living model find in thee — 
A violet! 



The St. Mary's Muse 



The Best Laid Plans 

By Fielding Douthat, '21 

June found the Robinsons once again enlivening the little cottaJ 
on Lilly Lake. Patsie's red head flashed on the tennis court in com- 
bat with the favorite "frat" brother that Tom had brought back with 
him, so fine an athlete that even her skill could not outstrip him. But,, 
besides Patsie and Tom and Marvin Wake, there was yet some ond 
else, a dark man with sombre eyes that narrowed when he looked a.% 
Patsie, and long eyebrows that raised cynically at her remarks. He 
lolled in the hammock in the moonlight and puffed long scented! 
cigarettes, and worked in his spare moments, and merely as a side: 
issue (so thought Tom anyway) on some construction plans for Mrj 
Robinson. 

And June found Patsie, the fiery, energetic, magnificent Patsie, 
a drooping love-sick damsel, at the feet of Sir Roland Dubois. She 
languished when he was not around, she trembled and turned cold 
when he was, and she wrote in her diary silly young things about 
men of brain and brawn, and the fascination of hair greying around 
the temples. She spoke to her diary in this manner : 

"Oh, diary dear, you just don't know what a change has come over 
me since I filled your pages up with girlish nonsense last summer, 
I have slipped through the gates of Womanhood and left behind 
forever those pleasant girlhood days. I have come to look upon Mar- 
vin, whom last year I fancied I loved, as a healthy young animal 
a liver (here Miss Romance frowned and scratched out the lasl 
word), as a being who cares only for the physical, the material, th( 
external things. A far greater man has come into my life— a mar 
who is great and strong, and who reads great, thick, deep books, anc 
talks about a woman's soul ! Oh, I love him, diary, I love him 
I call the heavens to witness (but, here let us stop, we have too mucl 
pity and respect even for the follies of youth to let you laugh a' 
Patsie's very unoriginal and over-sentimental vows of love.) 

Meanwhile, Sir Roland Dubois, the vamp, sublimely unconsciou;, 
of the erstwhile vamped, turned in his genius' mind more importaa 
things— great plans for ships and engines, and machinery, an<| 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Tom and Marvin were obliged to meet quite often in frowning con- 
sultations down by the boat-house. 

"It is just this way," Tom was saying, "things look pretty black 
for you, old boy, and they are getting worse every day. If we don't 
get busy and do something Dubois is going to see it and vou and 
I know that dad's money and Patsie's good looks are not things to be 

: passed over without consideration, and " 

^STow, look here, Tom—" Marvin began, but Tom cut him short. 

"Aw, shut up, don't you reckon I know it's different with you, and 

i don't you see I'm doing everything I can for you— aw— " Tom 

| rumpled his fiery mop in exasperation, "and here you are balking just 

I because you are afraid of getting a scream out of an old girl !" 

Still, Marvin was dubious, "I can't help but think it's a rather 
underhanded proceeding, Tom." 

"It is the only way," persisted the tempter. "If there was a way 
of making her think Sir Eoland not a hero we would use that, but 
: as it is, our only chance is in making her think that you are. It will 
; be like this, she will call for your gallant aid, and then you will 
j appear, and she'll fall on your neck, and oh— mush— you know the 
1 rest !" 

i Marvin eyed the bundle in the bottom of the boat and passed his 
I hand over his head (notice that he passed his hand over his head, 
| while Tom rumpled his mop, for Marvin knew well the value of a 
I shiny pompadour in the affairs of love). "But, suppose she should 
faint ?" he queried. 

Tom tucked his bundle under his arm and climbed up on the wharf. 
"Then I wash my hands of the whole affair !" 

It was thus that Marvin's ardor got the better of his chivalry, he 
stuck out his hand to Tom, "It's a go then, Tom," and they shook 
solemnly and vehemently, and disappeared in different directions, 
Tom headed for Mom Christmas' cabin, over the hills, and Marvin to 
traverse the road leading a little below the cabin. 

A little later, when the sun began to drop low over Lilly Lake, true 
to the surmises of her brother Tom, Patsie came out of the house, 
clad in a fluffy green organdie, and wended her way along the path 
leading over the hills to the old negro's cabin. She was going to have 



The St. Mary's Muse 



her fortune told, as had always been her custom since the days when 
a sentimental valentine was her only cause of worry, and Mom Christ- 
mas had always counseled her wisely and sent her away with some' 
charm that could be worked in the moonlight, and that always brought 
comfort to Patsie's romantic soul. 

Two silver slippers patted along through the leaves, over the hills. 
Marvin, perched on a stump down by the roadside, nervously whit- 
tling a stick, saw the flutter of the green organdie through the trees ! 
topped with a crown of glorious copper and promptly cut his finger. 
An old man in a long, black beard and ragged coat, hidden in the 
bushes above the path, peeped around a tree at her as she went by 
and suppressed a grin. 

The sun had gone to bed over Lilly Lake and the moon and stars 
were in full possession of the sky when the green organdie came out 
of the little cabin again. Upon the hill the ragged old man was 
dozing, but the sentinel on the stump kept wide-awake and anxious. 
The night was still save for the insects in the woods and the strum- 
strum of the banjo that came out through the open cabin door. 
Then— 

"Good-bye, Mom Christmas," in Patsie's clear voice, followed by 
the old negro's "Good-night, honey, do what yer mammy tell yu and 
de good luck sho' gwinte come t' you. Now, mind yu way along dat 
path and doan stump up yer pretty shoes !" 

The cabin door closed, shutting out the shaft of light and the music 
of the banjo. After that only the soft rustle, rustle of silver slippers 
in the leaves. The rustle was climbing the middle hillock when it 
was suddenly arrested by the ragged man in the long beard, who 
ruthlessly seized upon the fair young rustler and dashed off with her 
into the woods, or rather he labored off with her, for this particular 
young lady was no mean athlete and could kick right viciously and 
scream right lustily. But, woe betide the bold abducter, for through 
the trees, right after him, bounded our sentinel of the stump, sur- 
prisingly calm, seeing that it was his lady-love who was being so 
cruelly carried off. He soon overtook them and pouncing upon the 
ragged individual, he— but the ragged individual just dropped down 



[at 

31C 



The St. Mary's Muse 5 

obligingly on the ground without any resistance at all! Strange! 
But Marvin, in his haste, tripped over him so that he ejaculated as 
he embraced mother earth, "Well, darn you, blunder things up, do I" 

Then Patsie was clinging blindly to her rescuer and crying such 
things as this, u Oh, Roland, Eoland, I knew you would come. I 
called you and I knew you would come !" 

The bandit raised himself from the ground, and with a grunt of 
utter disgust, strolled off through the trees. 

The heart of Patsie's comforter sank down to the very bottom of 
his toes. He grew rigid and very gently and very firmly unclasped 
the clinging arms. He could not speak, but just stood there in white, 
silent agony, while shame burned hotter and hotter in Patsie's 
cheeks. 

"Come on," choked Marvin, "Will you at least let me see you 
home safely ?" 

Silently they strolled through the moon-splotched woods. Un- 
broken silence prevailed. Great tears of mortification and of pity 
; gleamed in Patsie's eyes. She was so utterly, utterly miserable! 
: And every nerve was keenly conscious of the steadying hand on her 
arm, and she longed so for the comfort of that faithful shoulder 
i again. Sir Eoland or not Sir Roland, it had proved very satisfac- 
tory in her need before. She heard Marvin saying "Good-night," 
|and through the tears discerned her own cottage door all wiggerly 
i and wobbly, and blindly she stepped into this blocked and wavering 
(darkness. A streak of light was doing the hula-hula through the 
I bottom of the sitting-room door, so she stuck her head in to see who 
1 could still be up, in hopes that — (but you know what she hoped as 
(well as I do). A man was reading under the electrolier and an open 
magazine hid his face from view, but over the top of it floated a trail 
| of scented smoke that made her heart beat fast and jerky. Only it 
was not the effect of love now, but of disgust and anger. She hated 
him for all the trouble he had caused her, and for wrecking her life 
(poor unconscious Sir Roland), but most of all, she hated him for 
sitting there so snugly reading while she was being carried away by 
ragged men in long beards. She dabbed at her eyes viciously to get 
a clearer vision. It was then that the title of the magazine smote her 



6 The St. Mary's Muse 

in the face! The Ladies' Home Journal!" It was the last straw. 
With an exclamation that sounded like "Ugh !" Patsie went out the 
way she had come and with the quick bang of the door she shut out of 
her life forever Sir Roland Dubois, the vampful. 

She tipped out on the porch where Marvin was smoking a lonesome 
cigarette and groaning with every puff, "Lord, what a moon to go to 
waste !" Then a very miserable, repentant and disillusioned Patsie 
fluffed down beside him. 

"Oh, Marvin," she moaned, "He's reading The Ladies Home 
Journal !" 

Then Marvin forgot and forgave and murmured some foolish 
words, that sound just too silly when you write them, but were very 
sweet and comforting, and evidently effective, for after that she went 
down with him to see the superior beauties of the moon as seen over 
Lilly Lake. 



Fari)iliar Scenes 

I know a place where the stately oaks 
Are growing; where the sunbeams fall 
"lis there the vines and roses twine 
And happy youthful voices call. 

I know a room where the patient clock 
Ticks off the minutes, one by one, 
And where four-score of weary girls 
Wait till the study hour is done. 

I know a spot that is holy, calm — 
Whose stained glass windows catch the gleams 
That fall on the reverent, bending heads — 
A sacred spot of school-girl dreams. 

These are the scenes that we know so well, 
And that, somehow, we've learned to love 
When nears the time we bid farewell 
To school-room, chapel and grove! 

K. Waddeix. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Tl}e GaroiQ 

M. Gaeeissen, '23 

"All men are created equal," is the principle upon which this gov- 
ernment of ours is based, and, God willing, that might be true were 
it not for man. The Gamin would have grinned at the thought had 
it ever been put up to him, but it never was, and so the Gamin lived 
his starved and pinched little life in sordid surroundings and did not 
question. 

But, one morning the Gamin was absent from his post; nobody 
missed him — there was no one to miss him. That was the morning 
the Gamin did not wake — only in his dreams he heard a terrible 
crash — that was all. 

He did not know about the fallen tenement, about the crowd and 
the policeman, who found him buried beneath a collapsed wall, or 
about the pathetic little figure, which was himself, and the pitying 
comments of the crowd ; nor did he know about the stretcher and the 
ambulance. The ruins soon yielded up their prey, huddled and un- 
naturally hushed forms ; the crowd dispersed, and his world moved on 
just as it had before, save for the eight or nine vacancies which nobody 
noticed and nobody missed ; they were merely as figures swiftly and 
silently erased from a slate by a damp sponge, and women with their 
children who had escaped thankful-hearted, sweated and labored and 
were cramped in squalor and filth in other tenements, and were not 
so thankful ; gaunt men with tired faces hardened and lined by toil, 
and blackened by grime and smoke, returned at even to what they 
knew as home, and were less thankful. 

The world rolled on while the Gamin slept. Doctors bent over 
his silent, huddled form, and shook their heads gravely ; white-capped 
nurses carried out orders and stood by the surgeon's side, ready to 
execute his slightest commands; shining instrument flashed in the 
surgeon's hands and after a time a stretcher delivered its burden to 
a little white bed in a little square room at the end of a silent hallway. 

Then, one day, the Gamin awoke. The shade was drawn and his 
little world was quite still and dark. He was lying on something 
white and very soft. The Gamin was puzzled. A vague picture, 



The St. Mary's Muse 



painted by a kindly old man of the tenement, flitted hazily across his 
mind; it was a picture of Heaven, a wonderful place somewhere 
above the blue of the sky; a place where beings, called angels, sang 
softly, and walked up streets paved in shining gold. It was a place 
where people went after that mysterious thing, called Death, claimed 
them. The old man was dead now. The Gamin was frankly 
curious. He tried to raise himself and look around, but he felt very 
weak and dizzy, owing to the fact that he was dead, probably, and, 
also the highness of the cloud on which he was riding, for the Gamin 
felt convinced that it was a cloud. 

The Gamin lay back and shut his eyes and tried very hard to recol- 
lect how he had died, and he wondered when the cloud would get him 
to the place called Heaven. He lay quite still there in the dark for 
a time that seemed a very long time to him, and a cold fear began to 
creep over his heart. Suppose the cloud had lost its way ; what then ? 
He was feeling very much alone and very much afraid when he heard 
music — very soft, and very sweet, and very far away, but he was quite 
sure it was the angels singing, and the cloud must be very near 
Heaven now, and so he smiled a little smile of happiness and fell 
asleep again. 

Down in the little chapel, 'mid the Easter lilies, the interne sang 
in a clear tenor : 

"He is risen. The Lord is risen, indeed." 

He sang it very sweetly and very happily, and as he sang he looked 
straight at the pretty little probationer, who kept her head bent and 
placed her hymnal very carefully over her left hand. 

The Gamin lay propped up among many pillows, waiting. He waited 
every day at this time for Mr. Jimmy, and wondered what new thing 
Mr. Jimmy would bring him. He had even learned to put away the 
fear that Mr. Jimmy and the rest of this unreal wonder would fade. 
There had been fruit and flowers, checkers and a baseball mitt, a 
pocket knife, and numerous other things. Yesterday, there had been 
a book with beautiful pictures and some printing which the Gamin 



The St. Mary's Muse 



could not read, and when he had asked Miss Brown to teach him how, 
she had exchanged a quick little glance of exultation with Mr. Jimmy' 
and she promised the Gamin very quickly that he should begin to 
learn right away. Also, Mr. Jimmy had told him that when he was 
quite well he should learn other things and some day he should go to 
college. The Gamin was quite sure that whatever college might be, 
it must be something wonderful, for Mr. Jimmy was his hero. 

The Gamin was quite fond of Miss Brown; he thought she was 
very pretty, almost as pretty as a poster he had once seen of a painted 
dancing girl, and he had thought her beautiful. When he got to be 
a man he would do something nice for her. One clay he had asked 
if she didn't want Mr. Jimmy to send her to college, too, and she had 
turned very red and gone after something she said she had left in the 
hall. When she came back she had refused to discuss the subject. 
The Gamin was puzzled; so puzzled in fact, that he had asked Mr. 
Jimmy why she had turned so red when he had asked her such a nice 
question. Mr. Jimmy had turned rather red, himself, and coughed 
a little ; it was then that he had very quickly presented the pocket- 
knife. 

But that clay Mr. Jimmy did not come. Instead, he sent a note 
and a very gorgeous top. Miss Brown read him the note and the 
Gamin noticed then that her eyes were very red, as if she had been 
crying, but when he asked her why, she looked quite innocent and 
said she must have strained them reading Mr. Jimmy's note— she 
called him Mr. Graham very primly, which was quite unusual, as he 
wrote a very fine hand. Then she saw something on the back of the 
note and turned very red and rose hastily to go for something she had 
left in the hall. She was always leaving things in the hall, the Gamin 
thought. 

But Miss Brown did not return immediately. Instead, she went 
to her own room and did a very queer thing. She tore Mr. Jimmy's 
note into very small bits and put the little heap on the table, and then 
she put her head clown on the table and cried a bit, then she straight- 
ened up and put a dab of powder on her nose and laughed a bit, and 



10 The St. Mart's Muse 



when she went back to the Gamin she wore a bunch of violets tucked 
in at her waist. 

The Gamin was asleep; at least to all outward appearances he 
was asleep, but he was not quite asleep. Mr. Jimmy came, but the 
Gamin lay still. He had a queer idea that Miss Brown had had 
something to do with Mr. Jimmy's absence the day before and he 
meant to find out about it, if possible. 

Miss Brown had discarded the violets for a rosebud the color of 
her cheeks. Mr. Jimmy looked toward the Gamin's bed. "Asleep ?" 
he questioned. Miss Brown nodded. 

"Jane !" said Mr. Jimmy. 

There followed a pause during which the Gamin lay with eyelids 
tightly closed, and then — 

The Gamin opened one eye and smiled— the rosebud adorned the 
lapel of Mr. Jimmy's coat ! 



POET'S CORNER 



The MocKjng-Bird 

How be ye, Mr. Mocking-bird, 

A settin' in de tree? 
You swings upon de topmos' bough 
An' sings 'bout what you see. 

Ah sees you dar, you rascal, you, 
Ah sees you, an' ah hears 
Dem golden strains o' melody 
You pours into mah ears. 

An' when ah climbs dem golden stairs, 
An' goes to dwell above, 
Ah hopes you'll be a-singing dere 
Dem joyful songs o' love. 

Marietta Gareissen. 



The St. Mary's Muse 11 



Th)e Melody 

From my windows I can see 
Things that make a melody; 
There, the poplars from the vale 
Climb a slow ascending scale. 

Up and down in little trills 
Runs a road across the hills; 
Soft and sweetly sings the breeze, 
Sighs a rhythm through the trees. 

Louder now the chords have grown, 
Formed by chimneys, thickly sown; 
And the harmony is lent 
By the beams the sun has sent. 

When the sun lies down to sleep, 
Stars and moon their vigil keep; 
When I can no longer see — 
Finished is the melody. 



Marietta Gareissen. 



I like it when it rains and rains 
As hard as hard can be; 
I like to ford the streams it makes 
And cross each little sea. 

I like to leave my shoes at home, 
And take my little boat 
And launch it in my river swift, 
And watch it downward float. 

And when the sun has all dried up 
My ponds and rivers, then 
I put my little boat away 
Until it rains again. 

Marietta Gareissen. 



12 The St. Maky's Muse 



My Love 

I loved her more than anything 
I ever had before, 
And every time I held her 
I loved her more and more. 

She helped me when in trouble, too, 
And cheered me when in tears; 
It seemed she always knew just how 
To drive away my fears. 

Her eyes were blue, that deep, deep blue, 
That comes from summer seas, 
And not a feature did she have 
That was not made to please. 

Her skin was fair and oh, so soft; 
Her figure — gee! Divine! 
Who was this paragon, you say? 
That "Ole Rag Doll o'Mine." 

E. Lewis. 



The moon rose copper against the wood; 

The dark, green wood of olden oak. 
A slender shape in a crimson hood, 

Moving as still as the fairy-folk. 

Silent and still she paused in the light; 

Standing beneath the giant tree. 
A sudden noise, a short, quick flight. 

And silence on the moonlit lea. 

Two figures dark against the moon. 

A riderless horse, a mounted one. 
That pause in the shadow of the wood, 

And the green-cloaked rider whistles a tune. 

Two figures -dark against the moon. 

The olden oaks stand silent and still 
While the hoofs of the horses beat the tune; 

And the figures sink behind the hill. 

E. Glass. 






The St. Mary's Muse 13 



0MONG OURSELVES 

"Oil, I'm choking, I'm choking; it's just killing me! I know I'll 
never survive ! Oh, please don't make me do it ; have mercy on me !' 

A look of intense agony transformed the face of a young and 
beautiful girl into that of an old, though far from resigned, sufferer. 

The anxious friends stood by — frantic fear clutching their hearts, 
uttering little exclamations of horror at the sad spectacle. 

For, what could be more touching than to see one's chum helpless 
in the clutches of Anna Belle and patient Miss Alex, desperately 
trying to force down a big black St. Mary's pill ! 

E. Lewis. 



"Carr, Marks, Walker — I held my breath. It was so impos- 
sible for me to hope that I had been overlooked ! I sat on the edge 
of my seat and clutched the collar of the girl in front for support. 
The voice continued to call off the names of the victims. 

"Tucker, M. Nixon, D. Nixon, Ballard — " It did not take me 
long to imagine what their sin had been. If you remember, their 
usual habit is awaking before dawn, not only stamping around their 
room, but moving all the furniture about and disturbing the ivhole 
building — But, hark! the voice again — "K. Faulkner, Fitz and 
James." In trouble again! Forgive them, do they say? Why 
not? Seventy times seven is the limit. But, sometimes, we do 
wonder how Mrs. Perkins keeps count. 

My heart was registering forty beats per second, as she picked up 
the last sheet. In due time — "L. Joyner, Douthat (some one in the 
rear collapsed). My breath came in sharp gasps now, and as I heard 
my name, in cool clear syllables, my endurance came to an end. My 
heart gave one bound and then refused to work. 

I faintly remember putting on my chapel cap and marching out 
with the others, but every time I tried to think, strange objects 
floated through my mind. I saw myself sitting forlornly on the 
campus one bright Monday morning, and gangs and gangs of girls 
were telling me good-bye and going off to town. 



14 The St. Mart's Muse 



Ye gods ! Who was it that said, "Be sure your sins will find you 

out." Wonder what it is that makes that always pop in my mind — 

funny thing though, you know, it always seems to come just too 

late ! 

E. Lewis. 



"Oo-o-o ! Maurine ! What can that be % Oh, I'm so scared ; do 
wake up !" 

I gave my room-mate a punch in the ribs, trembling as I did so. 
No answer came to my entreaty except an increased amount of snor- 
ing. Something outside my window made a terrible noise ; it sounded 
as if some one were creeping along, and I could almost hear him 
breathe. 

"Maurine, if you don't wake up, I'll die !" This time I gave her 
a vigorous shake. 

"Uh ! Uh ! What— what's the matter ? Oh, go on, Ellen ; let 
me alone ; scared again ? What is it this time ?" 

"Oh, nothing," I answered. "I just wanted you to wake up, 
'cause I couldn't go to sleep. Isn't this a dark night, though ? Won- 
der why the night watchman turned off the light outside the window ?" 

I received no answer to my question and I could tell by my roomie's 
regular breathing that she was already in the land of nod. 

"Why cant I go to sleep ?" This I said over and over, but no 
answer came to my question. I lay there, scarcely breathing, until 
a sudden jar of the room made me jump. I heard a box overturn 
and thousands of things, which sounded like marbles, roll over our 
floor. 

"Oh, me," I thought. "Why did I leave those pecans in the box 
where a rat could turn them over ? Now, the whole army of rats 
will come forth for their nightly gathering." 

No sooner had I thought this than I heard a grating sound at my 
head. I knew that Mr. Grandfather rat was sallying forth. I heard 
him drag himself across the floor until he reached the first rat, then 



The St. Mary's Muse 15 



they began collecting the nnts. 

Both rats began to squeak, and in a few moments I knew that my 
room was alive with the horrid things ! I was so scared I could not 
move. They were in the waste basket, on the window-sill, every- 
where ! When I could stand it no longer I jumped up and switched 
on the light. In the middle of the floor, perched on its hind legs, 
sat one little mouse, playing with a few nut shells that had been left 

on the floor! 

E. Lewis. 



Just Those Basketball FaQatics flgain! 

"Creak ! creak ! creak !" went the old stairs, ladened with the mis- 
chief and the stealth of several young maidens — "Bam !" Over 
cautiousness caused disaster and a careful, too carefully placed foot 
slipped and two girls, half clad, were suddenly precipitated with 
a resounding bump at the foot of the stairs. There they sat, quite 
astonished, having gathered in their journey twenty-six splinters, 
deposited in sundry and various smarting places and gleaned 
from that terribly renowned hall, second floor, East Wing. 
A girl's undignified titter, backed by anguish and a sense of the droll, 
made several drowsy-headed people turn over sleepily with black 
revenge in their hearts and a naughty syllable on their lips. 

Dumsey's none too angelic disposition wasn't improved very much 
by this untimely awakening from dreams of Jack and Bill, and candy 
and flowers, and then more candy — and then at this preposterous 
hour in the morning. 

"I wish those girls would have more consideration for others. 
I want to sleep, basketball or no basketball." She cast an envious 
glance at her slumbering room-mate. "Don't see how she does it. 
I believe Tommy would sleep through an earthquake!" With one 
last thought of murder for the creaking boards and the trespassers 
thereof, she covered her head and sought slumber land once more. 

"Eap ! rap ! rap !" on the door and a wild rattling of the door-knob. 
Dumsey turned over but Tommy did not move. Silence reigned 
supreme in the room. The door opened suddenly and Tommy's 



16 The St. Mary's Muse 



dreams of goals, goals, and more goals, were brought to a sudden end, 
and Tommy herself, was rudely jerked out of bed and deposited on 
the floor, a cold, shivering Tommy, eyes not yet open, but a good- 
natured smile on her lips. 

"Say, what time is it, anyway; daybreak?" she asked. Laughter 
from the others and an overturned chair and Dumsey awoke quite as 
suddenly, and albeit a little more rapidly. 

"You all get out of here and let me sleep — Go put some clothes 
on and leave me alone — Wish basketball had never been invented !" 

Muriel Dougherty. 

Easter Bonnets, Boxes and Bouquets 

What anxiety seizes the heart of each maid as Easter draws near. 
What hectic rushing about in search of the desired bonnet, with the 
desired shape, and vampish air we all crave. 

How anxiously we haunt the postoffice, scanning with anxious eyes 
the "perishable" boxes for the one bearing our name. 

But it is on Saturday that the look of tragedy is noted in blue and 
brown eyes. Will he send flowers or candy? Or, humiliating 
thoughts, will he send anything! 

Those who are popular enough to expect anything rush out madly 
and almost crush the poor special boy in the eagerness to examine the 
unmistakable florist boxes. Others who scarcely dare hope, hang on 
the outside and receive with wild shrieks of joy or a pretended care- 
lessness the boxes bearing their names. 

How much it means in our young lives ! For "Vanity, all is 
vanity." 

"Winifred Waddell. 



Colds 



"What's the matter with you, honey?" was the chorus from the 
filled beds, as a new occupant slipped quietly into a bed which hap- 
pened to be empty. 

"Nothing much, 'cept a cold. I didn't want to stay in the Infirm- 
ary, anyway. Just asked her for an aspirin," accompanied by a sob, 



1 



The St. Mary's Muse 17 



and the usual answer had been given to the usual question. "Usual," 
because this was not the first girl who had been called upon to answer 
that same question. Indeed, she was nearer the last, for after a day 
or so this question would have been entirely superfluous, and probably 
would have been disdainfully answered as though the questioner were 
a little delirious. Everybody had a cold and it looked like every- 
body else ought to know it ! 

Of course, the Infirmary couldn't hold an indefinite number, and 
after many additional beds had been added and patients still came, 
those who were so unfortunate as to be living on the first floor of 
West Wing and not to have the "formal cold" were literally turned 
out of house and home. Thus a convalescent ward was made for 
those girls who were well enough to leave the Infirmary, but not well 
enough to start classes or to mingle with the other girls. 

Now, the convalescent ward was a place looked upon with the eyes 
of envy by those who were either too well or too sick for it. Nothing 
to do but entertain each other, no assemblies, no classes, no chapel ; 
and on the affirmative side, convalescent meals! What else could 
one have desired ? Oh, memorable day, at least for the convalescents, 
when they witnessed their table with a huge platter on which was 
steaming a really, truly, thick, broiled steak ! 

So, after all, the colds weren't so terrible. There is usually some- 
thing pleasant to look forward to after the unpleasant ; and this was 
no exception to the rule. Just as after the pills, came the orange; 
after the Infirmary came the Convalescent Ward; so, best of all, 
after the colds came the spring holidays and home ! 

F. F. K. 



Lost — after the game — a medium-pitched, much-used and prac- 
ticed voice. Finder please return to Miss Dorothy Baum and receive 
suitable reward. 

Fotikt) — in Senior Hall swing — a small, warm red heart, contain- 
ing several unexpressed thoughts. To claim it, apply at 28 Senior 
Hall. 



18 The St. Mary's Muse 

Wanted — a pair of tweezers, to pull up the Seniors' History 
marks. 






Lost, Strayed, or Stolen — from Miss Susanne Pegues, on the 
tennis court, five pounds of avoirdupois. Finder may keep it. 

Lost — one mind of reasonable ability, perfectly empty. If found, 

please return to the Editor ! 

K. W. 



How It Happened 

She said that it was silly — 
This thing called crushed, you know; 

How any one with common sense 
Could fall, and rave on so, 

She really could not understand, 
But, then she fell — and, oh! 

'Twas Mary this and Mary that 

With scarce a pause between; 
Oh, Mary was the sweetest girl 

You've ever heard or seen, 
And candy flowers and ice cream 

Poured in a steady stream. 

Thus runs the tale of crushes — 

'Tis an old, old one, you see; 
I'm warning you, dear school-mates, 

'Cause it happened once to me. 
It really ain't a bit of fun; 

A tragic fate — oh, gee! 

Winifred Waddell. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price -----____ Two Dollars 
Single Copies ______ Twenty-five Cents 

A magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, 
Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial 
management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1920-1921 

Frances Venable, '21, Chairman 

Katherine Waddell, '21, 2 A Louise Egleston, '22, E A n 

Editors 
Susan Collier, Business Manager 

Helen Budge, Assistant Business Manager 

* — — 

EDITORIAL 

"Sky so blue it makes you wonder 

If it's Heaven shining through; 
Earth so smiling 'way out yonder 

Sun so bright it dazzles you; 
Birds a-singing, flowers a-flinging 

All their fragrance on the breeze; 
Dancing shadows, green, still meadows; 

Don't you mope, you've still got these." 

There is no use mentioning the subject of "blues," because you just 
cannot have them when all the spring-time world is so beautiful and 
gay about you. It is impossible to imagine a more lovely scene than 
the grove in spring attire — green grass, green trees ; roses, wistaria, 
ivy, and, above all, the blue, blue sky, with hardly a cloud to disturb 
its serenity. In the afternoons, when everybody appears for a stroll 
in light dresses, self-made or otherwise, it is a veritable living flower 
garden. It is a picture that those of us whose last spring at St. 
Mary's it is will always keep in our memories. The Seniors, of 
course, are the ones to whom it is dearest, but there are others of us 



20 The St. Mary's Muse 



. 



who are not coming back, either, and there are still others who are yet 
undecided as to whether or not they will return. It is time to be 
thinking about it and making up our minds about "next year." Just 
be sure to make up your mind in the right direction ! There is one 
thing sure about St. Mary's and that is the longer you stay the better 
you like it — ask the Seniors ! Let those of us who can, come back, 
and as for those who cannot, we will look on our year or years at St. 
Mary's as an "experience, wholesome and sweet," and do the little 
we can to carry with us Alma Mater's teachings of "earnestness, 
wisdom and love." 



SCHOOL NEWS 

College Club 

There has recently been added to the school activities a novel and 
distinctive feature in the formation of a college club. The club aims 
to bind more closely together those girls who are anticipating college 
life and to stimulate them towards their future college work. The 
club was organized through the influence of Miss Stone. Frances 
Hoskins was elected president and as secretary and treasurer, the 
club chose Eleanor Cobb. Its members number seven, but its roll is 
certain to be enlarged as the club grows in influence. The club held 
its first meeting in the library Saturday night, March 24th. The 
faculty and friends of the members attended. This first meeting was 
made a memorable one in that Dean Haskel, of Columbia University, 
made a very fine and interesting address. Every one is watching 
with interest the growth of this new organization, and we predict for 
it a very successful future. 



A Serjior-JuQior Treat 



The Seniors and Juniors had a very pleasant treat in being privi 
leged to attend the Carolina-Trinity game on Saturday night, March 
5th. This game was the decisive game for State championship in 
basketball. Carolina seemed to find Trinity easy work, for the score 
55 to 18, in her favor, showed that Carolina just actually walked 






The St. Mary's Muse 21 



away with her victory. The Seniors and Juniors, chaperoned by 
Miss Sutton, were very enthusiastic spectators and enjoyed the game 
exceedingly, especially since it was our first outing since the quaran- 
tine had been lifted. 

Sign)as Win Second Tearr) Charopionship 

On Tuesday night, March 22d, the Sigma and Mu second teams 
met for their final conflict of the basketball season. 

The Sigmas, brilliant in their characteristic colors of red and white, 
vied with the blue and white-clad Mus in giving hearty cheers and 
songs. 

From the very beginning, the game proved to be one of the most 
exciting that ever Signias and Mus witnessed. Every player played 
her best. The team work on both sides was excellent ; the pass work 
was quick and snappy. Mary McCoy got the ball in the basket with 
an almost dazzling rapidity, while Kate Kichards delighted the en- 
thusiastic Signias with her all-round playing. The centers and 
guards, although not as spectacular, played beyond the expectations 
of every one. 

The score was very close throughout the entire game. However, 
the Sigmas proved victorious with 31 points in their favor against 
23 made by the Mus. This gave the Sigmas the second team cham- 
pionship and means an addition of 20 points to the score for the 

year. 

The Mus have been successful in two of the first team games, which 
means that they are well on their way towards gaining the coveted 
30 points awarded to the first team championship. The athletic 
contest bids fair to be a very close one this year. 

The line-up was as follows: 

Sigina Mu 

Shards I Forwards i M ° C ° y 

Thompson \ Forwards j Gariessen 

M. Powell J _ . a < Nelson, Capt. 

F.Boykin [ CentGrS j M. Wood 

Yarborough, Capt. i _ , (V. Wilkins 

Cooper j GuardS jj.W.Ashworth 



22 The St. Mart's Mttstt. 



Dr. HasKell's Visit 

The School has been particularly fortunate in having as a visitor 
Dr. Haskell, Dean of women of Columbia University, who has been 
spending Easter with Miss Stone. On Saturday night Dr. Haskell 
talked informally to the members of the College Club and the faculty, 
taking as her subject "German Spies." She is a very charming 
speaker and this talk was entertaining as well as instructive. On 
Sunday night after supper, the faculty and students assembled in 
the parlor and Dr. Haskell made a splendid talk, one of the most 
inspiring that has been our pleasure to hear this year at St. Mary's. 
At Columbia, she said, there are six tests by which a person may find : 
out whether or not he is educated, in the real sense of the word. In 
conclusion she emphasized the final test which is the way we act; 
it was our deeds that prove our worth. Dr. Way, in announcing 
the assembly, had said that a treat was in store for us, and he was, 
indeed, justified in making that statement, for it was a pleasure and 
an inspiration to hear Dr. Haskell. In behalf of the School we extend 
unanimously to Dr. Haskell the invitation to revisit us, and we want 
her to feel that St. Mary's is ever ready to extend her a hearty wel- 
come when she again comes South. 

F. P. V. 



Volley Ball 

A great deal of interest has been taken in volley-ball recently. 
Mus and Sigmas, alike, came out with their usual pep for the final 
try-out. Each association had twenty-five girls interested in making 
volley-ball a success. 

The following teams were chosen : 

Sigma.— First Team Mu— First Team 
M. Powell E. Way 

M. Thompson M. Ambler 

S. Phillips M. L. Langley 

E. Collier F. Kent 

M. L. Everett H. Barber 






D. Nixon e. Villipigue 

M. Blakely f. Venable 

D. Baum m. Gresham 






The St. Mary's Muse 23 



Sigma— Second Team Mu— Second Team 

M. Willard B. L. Glass 

D. Cooper M. McCoy 

M. Nixon E. Nelson 

M. Brown J- W. Ashworth 

M. Withers V. Thigpen 

H. Boykin E. Tucker 

S. Pegues F. Reinhart 

S. Collier L- Smith 

Substitutes Substitutes 

K. Richards V. Wilkins 

M. W. Yarhorough F. Salley 

M. Huske M. Wood 

S. Egleston B. Ambler 



Con)iT)encement Marshals 

At the last meeting of the literary societies, held March 8, 1921, 
the choosing of the commencement marshals was the feature of the 
evening. This year the E. A. P.'s had the honor of choosing the 
chief marshal and we feel no hesitation at all in expressing for the 
entire student body approbation of their choice, Miss Lenore Powell. 
The two others elected by the E. A. P.'s were Lousie Egleston and 
Evelina Beckwith. The Sigma Lambdas elected Mary Louise Ever- 
ett and Julia Winston Ashworth. These are girls who have 
expressed their interests in their societies by frequently taking part 
in their activities, and we feel sure that better and more representa- 
tive girls could not be found anywhere. 

The marshals began their duties when they ushered in the chapel 

on Easter Sunday afternoon. 

J F. D. 



Lenten Activities 



Now that Lent is over, and once again we are dancing in the 
parlor, eating candy, desserts, dressed up ice-creams, and such things 
which we so nobly denied ourselves for forty days, let us look back on 
the various Lenten activities with which we busied ourselves. 

Of course, there were several things that we intended doing but 



24 The St. Mart's Muse 



Easter 

Easter morning dawned as sunshiny and fair as we could possibly 
wish, and it was with happy hearts that everybody dressed in white 
for the early morning service. Some got ready in time to go to the 
Domestic Science Room for coffee, which Mrs. Marriott had so 
kindly prepared. 

The Assembly Eoom hardly seemed the same place that we had 
left the night before, for it was filled with figures clad in white from 



which were interfered with by the siege of colds. But we are now 
thinking of what we did and not of what we did not do. 

The order of the chapel services was somewhat changed. There 
were the regular evening services Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and 
Saturday, but on Wednesdays and Fridays there were voluntary serv- 
ices, from six to six-thirty in the evening. The usual Thursday night 
talks were changed to Wednesday nights. 

On Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings, from seven-twenty 
to seven-thirty, there was -Morning Watch" in the chapel, led by dif- 
ferent ones of the girls. Every Friday night during the hour before 
study hall, the two mission study classes held their meetings. 

Instead of the chapters of the Church School Service League meet- 
ing, as usual on Sunday night, in their respective rooms, during Lent 
they united their efforts to give three joint meetings in the parlor, 
two or three chapters preparing the programs for a meeting which the 
whole school might enjoy. These were a great success, proving very 
interesting and helpful. The subjects of these meetings, with the 
chapters which took part in them, were as follows : 

Medical Missions in China— Kate McKimmon and St. Catherine's 
chapters. 

Mission Work in the Mountains of North Carolina—St Elizabeth, 
St. Anne and St. Margaret's Chapter. 

Alaska— Lucy Bratton, St. Agnes, and St. Monica's chapters. 

^ Bishop Cheshire was here at the service on Palm Sunday for con- 
firmation. Those confirmed were : Mary Lee, Alice Brunson, Alma 
Phelps, Emily Burgwyn, and Virginia Hopkins. 



1 



ii 



The St. Mary's Muse 25 



head to toe. Quietly we marched out into the sunshine and over to 
the chapel. The Easter hymns and flowers made an impression that 
lasted through the long and happy clay. 

After breakfast there was much to be done and so little time to 
do it in — mite boxes to be handed in, dresses to be changed for church, 
and last, but not least, our small protegees from St. Saviour's Mis- 
sion arrived to be decked in the Easter finery that the various Auxil- 
iary chapters had furnished each little girl. 

Some of us were fortunate enough to go out to dinner, but those who 
stayed at home enjoyed the unusually good Sunday dinner served 
in the dining-room. The choir furnished special music for the chapel 
services in the afternoon, and the newly-elected commencement mar- 
shals made their first appearance in white. 

Altogether, the day was a very happy one for everybody. 



May Day 

May-day and the crowning of her queen is being looked forward to 
, as one of the biggest events of the school year. Mary Louise Everett 
I has been elected by the student body as Queen and we all feel sure 
that she is the very one for the place. The date has been set for May 
2d. A committee of representatives from the various classes has been 
chosen, and Miss Hesse has put the arrangements entirely in their 
hands. Maids of the Queen's Court are to be chosen and last, but 
not least, the Court Jester. 

Miss Hesse has arranged a program of costumed dances to be given 
by some of the "gym" classes and members of the aesthetic dancing 
class. All members of the student body are urged to come this clay 
in costume. This will add greatly to the attractiveness of the affair, 
besides making each girl have a real part in May-day. With the 
grove as a setting and each girl taking part, May-day this year prom- 



ises to be an event never to be forgotten. 



M. E. F. 



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DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 

206-10 MASONIC TEMPLE 






SILVER DRUG STORE 



The Rexall Store 



Huyler's 
Candies 



The Place To Meet Your Friends 



Waterman 
Fountain Pens 



A bold and ravaging leopard 

"Was shot by a flock-tending shepherd. 

Next morning 'twas found 

Lying dead on the ground — 

The leopard the shepherd had peppered. 



— Froth. 



YOUR KIND OF SHOES 



At 



THOMPSON SHOE CO. 

1 7 East Martin Street 



"You get them when promised" 

ilortoh s Studio 

Masonic Temple 
"Workers in Artistic Photography" 



Advertisements 



?/. Mary's Girls Always Welcome at 

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^ull line of Ready-to-wear, Hosiery, Gloves, Furnishings, Dry 
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Waterman Ideal Fountain Pens 


WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
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JAMES E. THIEM 

Jell Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. C. 


RALEIGH, N. C. 


iOYSTEK'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 

Made Fresh Every Day 


SIDDELL'S STUDIO 

High-class Portrait and Kodak Finishing 
126 1-2 Fayetteville Street 



11:30 p. m. Student (regretfully): "Well, I must be off." 
She: "That's what I thought when I first met you." — Burr. 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



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208 FAYETTEVILLE ST. 



Order by Mail 



Phone 208 



E F I R D ' S 
DEPARTMENT 
STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



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& THOMAS 

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Store 

RALEIGH 



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MILLINERY 



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Phone 503 

103 Fayetteville Street 

Raleigh, n. c. 



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SEND FOR 1919 PRICE LIST 

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RALEIGH, N. G. 



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12 W. Hargett Street 



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FISH AND OYSTERS 



Cole: "'Liza, what fo' you-all buy dat uddah box of shoe blacknin'?" 
Black: "Go on, niggab, dat ain't shoe blacknin', dat's mab massage." 

— Wampus. 



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Royall & Borden Furniture 
: : Company : : 

Fayetteville Street 



Carolina Power 
& Light Company 



Electric Light, Power and Gas 



1376 - BOTH PHONES - 1377 



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Brotan's 

FIFTH AVENUE SHOPS 



Authentic Apparel for the College Miss 

108 Fayetteville St. 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



/ ESTBD.I858**j 

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CHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

R. S. BTJSBEE, Secretary and Treasurer 



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THE WAKE DRUG STORE 

Phones 228 



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Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 



Putting it Fairly 

Little Willie: "Pass me the butter." 
Mother (reproachfully) : "If what, Willie?" 
Little Willie: "If you can reach it." — Gargoyle. 



I" M I I I i I M I 1 II I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I ) I I I MT 




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STORE 



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THE YARBOROUGH 



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Largest Hotel. Dinners 
and Banquets a Spe- 
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B. H. GRIFFIN HOTEL CO., 

Proprietors 



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Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

The Big Hardware Men Raleigh, N. C. 



Base Balls, Basket Balls 
Tennis and Sporting Goods 



MISS SAIDIE M. KING 

Exclusive Ready-to-Wear 
123 Fayetteville Street Phone 1152 

Second floor Dobbin-FerralTs 



CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE Candies, Ice Cream, Fruit 

We carry the most complete line of Fruit and 

Candies in town. 

Ill FAYETTEVILLE STREET 

JOHNSON COAL & ICE CO. 

109 West Martin Street Phone 457 



Caviness' Grocery 

Everything Good to Eat 

HILLSBORO STREET 



THE FASHION Kaplan Bros. Co. 

The college girls' store for Snappy, Classy, 
Youthful Garments and Millinery. 

TEN PER CENT DISCOUNT TO COLLEGE 
STUDENTS AND TEACHERS 

KOONCE FURNITURE STORE 

111 East Hargett St. 

CHEAPEST PLACE 



" 's funny." 

"Shoot." 

"Bills are rectangular, and yet they come rolling in."— JacJc-o-lantern. 



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Insure Against Loss by Fire 

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Office: Raleigh Bank & Trust Co. Bldg. 
BAL-ElGkH., N. C. 



WATSON PICTURE AND ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades. 

GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance 




209 Fayetteville St. 



FROM INFANCY TO MATURITY 

Raleigh, N. C. 



Phone 2250 



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RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kind?: 



Auto Tire Repair Co. ™jy*pTintti e w 

108 WEST DAVIE STREET 

WALKER ELECTRIC SHOP 

WEST MARTIN STREET 



Advertisements 



T. R. WORKMAN 

Wall Paper and 
Interior Decorating 

SOUTH WILMINGTON STREET 



ORDER YOUR CUT FLOWERS 

FROM 

J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Phone 149 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
College Pexnants, Pillows, Piotttbes, 
Frames, Novelties. 



B.W.JONES 



The Best in 
Groceries 



THOMPSON ELECTRIC COMPANY 

132 Fayetteville Street RALEIGH, N. C. 

Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 



White's 



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Cream 



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in 

Raleigh 



Staudt's Bakery 



" My Mother's Bread " 
Once Tried Never Denied 



YOUNG & HUGHES 



Plumbers 

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Hot Water Heating 



S. Wilmington Street 



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T. B. GILL, Manager at Station 

Phone 529 

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PURE FOOD GROCERIES 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 

H. R. Hale & Bro. ^ h p : r r SHOES 

17 EAST MARTIN STREET 

MISSES BADGER & DENTON 

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Over T. W. Dobbin Co., 123 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

"The Store of Originations" 

ELLIS' 

Raleigh's Newest Ready-to-Wear Store 

126 Fayetteville Street 
WILLIAM HELLER 



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